Grad Success Week

Grad Success Week offers three days of seminars and panels for graduate students. Network with your fellow students, learn how to enhance your research and writing skills, or attend a wellness workshop.

This event took place May 3 – 5, 2022. See you next year!

Something for every graduate student

This summer, count on being productive. Grad Success Week offers three days of seminars and events designed to help you overcome common grad school obstacles and get down to business on your research and writing projects. Topics include:

  • Developing research proposals

  • How to get published

  • Presenting your research

  • Graduate funding applications

  • Project management and managing procrastination


FGS Dean

Breakfast with the dean

Grab a hearty breakfast and connect with Dr. Robin Yates, the Dean and Vice-Provost of Graduate Studies. Dr. Yates will present an opening session, after which you can meet your peers during some interactive and community-building activities.

Registration for this event is now closed.

Tuesday, May 3

Session Level:

C – Core: Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area

I – Intermediate: Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies

A – Advanced: Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study

Writing

Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

In this session, participants will become knowledgeable about the literature review writing genre. Participants will learn what literature review are, why they are important for graduate-level studies, and how they help develop critical research and thinking practices. Participants will also gain skills focused on starting the literature review writing process, which will include how to find and manage sources, how to identify and fill the gaps in academic knowledge, and how to organize their research and structure their ideas clearly and effectively.

Presented by: T.A. Pattinson, PhD, Writing Tutor, Student Success Centre

Time: 12:10 – 1:10 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Academic writing can be a time-consuming, lonely and frustrating experience. Don’t go through this alone — free help is available 7 days a week from Writing Support Services!

Many students are keen to improve their academic writing and learn strategies to write more effectively but are unaware of the vast amount of writing support available to them. The Student Success Centre has a team of experienced writing tutors ready to help you to improve your academic writing at all stages of the writing process. From online one-on-one appointments, evening sessions, online writing communities and workshops, there is a writing support service available to meet your needs.

Join the Writing Support Coordinator and the Student Success Centre Writing Tutors as they share the various ways all students at the university can access regular support for their writing.

Presented by: K. Heydon, Ph.D. Writing Support Coordinator, Student Success Centre

 

Time: 1:20 – 2:50 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Maintaining academic honesty as a student can be a complex endeavor. The proliferation of contract cheating companies, file-sharing websites and online tools present new challenges for students who strive to maintain their academic integrity. This session focuses on the emergence of online paraphrasing tools and explores whether students should use these tools as a strategy for improving their academic writing or whether their use risks academic misconduct. Join this interactive session that unpacks the space online paraphrasing tools occupy between writing improvement and facilitating plagiarism.

In this session, students will have the opportunity to ask questions. If you would like to submit questions in advance, please email them to askacademicintegrity@ucalgary.ca

Presented by: Lee-Ann Penaluna. Specialist, Academic Integrity and Student Success Initiatives, Student Success Centre

Research

Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

This session will cover the planning, development and refinement stages of writing a research proposal. We’ll begin with the use of preliminary data, identifying potential collaborations and deciding on an area of investigation, before turning to the tasks of clearly defining your research question; evaluating its scope, novelty and relevance; and demonstrating your suitability to carry out the study. Creating a succinct and relevant literature review and an impactful but realistic statement of the work’s contribution to its field of study and society at large will also be covered. The session will conclude with an examination of issues pertinent to the refinement phase, such as accuracy, abstract structure, self-editing and incorporating feedback. Time will be allotted for questions from the audience. 

Presented by: K. Quinn, PhD, Academic Advisor, Student Success Centre

Time: 12:10 – 1:10 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

This session is on Reference Management Tools such as EndNote, Mendeley, etc. Reference Management Tools are used to manage bibliographies and references when writing essays and articles.

Learning outcomes

In this session, participants will get to know the benefits of using a reference management tool. This includes an introduction to the basic functions of importing references and using the cite while you write a plugin for Microsoft Word.

Additionally, this session will introduce participants to the variety and pros and cons of reference management tools currently available.

Presented by: M. Stoeckle. Research & Learning Librarian, School of Creative & Performing Arts and School of Languages, Linguistics, Literatures & Cultures

Time: 1:20 – 2:50 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Applying project management principles to your dissertation can help you to: avoid conflict with your supervisor, reduce procrastination, manage feelings of being overwhelmed, and increase your motivation.

Learning outcomes:

At the end of this session, participants will have learned how to apply basic project management principles to the management of their dissertation.

Presented by: Dr. Paul Papin, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre

 

Time: 3 – 4:30 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Are you new to writing research proposals, or have you struggled with writing them in the past? 

This workshop offers practical advice about how to work through the process of developing and finishing a research proposal. It includes tips on how to get started, how to work through difficulties and writer’s block, and how to solicit and receive helpful feedback on your proposal.

Presented by: Jared Secord, Ph.D.,  Academic Strategist, Student Success Centre 

Time: 3 – 4:30 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

In this workshop, graduate students will become familiar with the various sources of funding and how and when they can apply for scholarships, awards, and bursaries. Students will also obtain an overview of the criteria and the components that make a strong application. Moreover, a discussion regarding how reviewers assess students’ applications will be provided. Examples will be provided on the competitive processes including Vanier, Killam, and GAC applications.

Presented by:

Donna-Marie McCafferty, Ph.D. associate professor, Department of Physiology & Pharmacology

Shasta Webb, PhD candidate, Faculty of Arts, Vanier scholar, GLC co-leader

Wellbeing

Time: 10:30 a.m. – noon MDT
Platform: Zoom

Have you had concerns about your substance use or behavioural addictions? Do you identify as being in recovery? Join Ashley in a conversation on her lived experience of using substances to cope with stress and finding her pathway to recovery as a university student. Reflect on your own experience with substance use or behavioural addictions and learn about strategies and available resources to assist your wellness journey.

Presented by: A. Ethier, MA, PhD Student in the Clinical Psychology

No recording or session materials available.

Time: 12:10 – 1:10 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Join an interactive workshop exploring mindfulness practice.  You’ll learn about specific strategies you can incorporate into your life to help you stay well and manage daily challenges in your personal and professional life.

Presented by: Alex Klassen, BSW, MSW, RSW, Counsellor (Instructor), Student Wellness Services

Time: 1:20 – 2:50 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

In today’s rapidly changing career landscape, being open to new ideas, learning from mistakes, and focusing on others’ needs is critical for career success. This depends largely on your mindset, your view of yourself, others, and the world. In this webinar, we will discuss how to cultivate three mindsets: growth, open, and outward.

Presented by: Matthew Geddes, MSc., Career Development Specialist, Masters Students, Career Services

Wednesday, May 4

Session Level:

C – Core: Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area

I – Intermediate: Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies

A – Advanced: Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study

Writing

Time: 9:30 – 10 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Academic posters are effective research communication and networking tools common to conferences. Despite the cancellation of many in-person conferences this season, being able to create an effective poster is a necessary academic skill. This session will cover the basics of creating and presenting them.

Presented by: Jennifer Lee, MISt, Liaison Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources

Time: 10:10 – 11:40 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

This workshop will help students understand the structure of academic argumentation through claims, evidence and warrants. We will also consider a few critical thinking themes that form the blueprint for all academic writing. These include critiquing a position based on concept/point of view, strength of evidence, flaws in reasoning and underlying epistemological assumptions. Students will have the chance to connect these themes to their own research.

Presented by: K. Heydon Ph.D. Writing Support Coordinator, Student Success Centre

Time: 1:10 – 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

The literature review is a major component of every thesis and dissertation.  It both addresses a critical gap in academic knowledge and grounds the legitimacy of one’s research. The literature review also allows students to contextualize their research projects within their respective fields and disciplines. This workshop will examine common errors graduate students make when completing literature reviews. It will also provide a variety of resources students can use throughout the writing and revising processes.

Presented by: T.A. Pattinson, PhD, Writing Tutor, Student Success Centre

Time: 1:10 – 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Do you have trouble finding a clear path through the forest of information that is a research article? Did you know that there’s more to an academic argument than logic? In this workshop, you’ll learn how to read for the rhetorical moves common to most research articles in Engineering, the Sciences and the Social Sciences. Using sample research articles, we’ll practice identifying and distinguishing between the research problem, background to the research problem, the importance of the research problem, research gap, methodological justifications, explanations for differences between present and past results, limitations on present results, and suggestions for further research.

Presented by: Dr. Paul Papin, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre, University of Calgary

 

Time: 2:50 – 4:20 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Have you ever wanted to present your research at an academic research conference? Unsure of how to present your work to a broad audience? Wondering how you can increase interest in your research? Come participate in a workshop designed to help you answer these questions. Participants will be introduced to strategies for producing an engaging abstract that is appropriate for a broad audience.  Topics include elements of an abstract, improving readability, and increasing research appeal.

Presented by: K. Heydon Ph.D. Writing Support Coordinator, Student Success Centre

Research

Time: 9:30 – 10 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

NVivo is a top-rated qualitative data analysis tool produced by QSR International.  NVivo supports researchers who need to analyze text-based documents, surveys, and multimedia files.  The University of Calgary has a license for NVivo, so it is available at no fee to students, staff and faculty.  This demo will show you the basics on how to get started.

Presented by: Jean Gomes, MA, MEd, senior institutional analyst with the Office of Institutional Analysis

Time: 9:30 – 10 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Are you wanting to blend survey-based data into your research? Come participate in this workshop and learn how to leverage survey software that every UCalgary staff, student, and faculty already has a license for.  You’ll learn how to create your account, how to create a survey, how to program questions, and see an introduction to some of the Qualtrics software features.  

Presented by: Phil Johnston, M.A., special projects administrator, Office of Institutional Analysis  

No session recording or materials available.

Time: 10:10 – 11:40 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Good management of research data, whether made up of spreadsheets, interview transcripts, image collections, digital records, or other material, will be crucial to your career as a graduate student and researcher. This session will focus on how to manage your data before, during, and after your research, as well as describe how to use DMP Assistant, a Canadian online tool for creating data management plans.

Presented by: Heather Ganshorn, MLIS. Associate Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources

Time: 12 – 1 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

LaTex is an open-source typesetting program designed to produce professional documents and PDF files. In this demonstration, we present the basics of how to use LaTeX and Overleaf, a great tool for formatting your thesis and bibliographies. This session will introduce the overleaf interface and provide simple examples of how to use LaTeX.

Presented by:

Jennifer Lee, MISt, Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources
John Brosz, PhD, Data Visualization Coordinator, Libraries and Cultural Resources

Time: 1:10 – 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

How do you stand out in a crowded field of researchers? How can you present a coherent picture of your research and its impact when applying for graduate or post-graduate positions? This session will introduce you to tools to create a researcher profile that highlights your expertise, as well as methods for tracking the impact of your work.

Presented by:

Christie Hurrell, MA, MLIS, Director, Lab NEXT, Libraries and Cultural Resources

Time: 1:10 – 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Do you have trouble finding a clear path through the forest of information that is a research article? Did you know that there’s more to an academic argument than logic? In this workshop, you’ll learn how to read for the rhetorical moves common to most research articles in Engineering, the Sciences and the Social Sciences. Using sample research articles, we’ll practice identifying and distinguishing between the research problem, background to the research problem, the importance of the research problem, research gap, methodological justifications, explanations for differences between present and past results, limitations on present results, and suggestions for further research.

Presented by: Dr. Paul Papin, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre, University of Calgary

Time: 2:50 – 4:20 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom/In-person (HS G744, Foothills Campus)

The candidacy workshop is an annually held student-run workshop for both first-year graduate students and those who are closer to their candidacy exam. It covers topics such as the Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) candidacy-exam format and timelines, requirements, planning a study schedule, and tips and suggestions for preparing and taking the exam. Additional resources will be provided for taking the exam remotely during the current COVID-19 crisis.

Learning outcomes

  • Be familiar with the CSM candidacy-exam format and timelines
  • Know how to plan and organize their exam preparation
  • Know what to expect during the exam

Presented by: Ali Kiani, Arsheen Rajan, Maryam Al-Khannaq

Wellbeing

Time: 10:10 –  11:40 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Are you an international graduate student feeling overwhelmed or worried? Come join this interactive and informative workshop that focuses on how to navigate and cope with the unique stresses of culture shock, wellness, and academics! Engage in reflective exercises, learn specific and practical strategies, and connect with other international graduate students to share in collective wisdom and knowledge.

Presented by: Danni Lei (She/Her), MSc., R. Psych, Counsellor, Mental Health Services - Student Wellness Services

Time: Noon –  1 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Join an interactive workshop exploring mindfulness practice.  You’ll learn about specific strategies you can incorporate into your life to help you stay well and manage daily challenges in your personal and professional life.

Presented by: Alex Klassen, BSW, MSW, RSW, Counsellor (Instructor), Student Wellness Services

Time: 3 –  4:15 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

As Canadian society becomes ever more diverse, so too does the graduate community on campus. At an institutional level, the University takes immense pride as a safe space that embraces various gender and sexual identities. Despite our tremendous progress, we know we still have a long way to achieve full inclusivity for our LGBTQ2S+ graduate community.

In this panel, we will give an opportunity for LGBTQ2S+ graduate students, to speak about their own experiences in graduate school. Through representation, we hope to promote an inclusive environment where individuals can feel empowered to live their true identities.

Due to the personal nature of this event, there is no session recording available.

Thursday, May 5

Session Level:

C – Core: Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area

I – Intermediate: Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies

A – Advanced: Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study

Writing

Time: 10:10 – 11:40 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Are you prepared to share your research progress or results in an academic setting? This workshop focuses on creating a clear and appealing visual and oral presentation that accurately represents your research findings without overwhelming your audience.

Presented by: K. Heydon Ph.D. Writing Support Coordinator, Student Success Centre

Time: 1:10 – 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Have you ever wondered what journal editors are looking for or what to expect going through the publishing process? Get the inside scoop on getting published in peer-reviewed journals in Social Science and Humanities. Featuring a panel of distinguished faculty with extensive knowledge and experience in academic publishing, this session will offer a journal editor’s perspective on what stops a paper from making it to the peer-review stage, what kinds of writing engage reviewers as well as practical advice (e.g., how to select which journal to submit to, how to handle harsh feedback from reviewers).

In this session, students will have the opportunity to ask questions to panellists. If you would like to submit questions in advance, please email them to wconline@ucalgary.ca

Panellists:

  • P. Benerjee, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology
  • S. Graham, Professor in the Department of Psychology
  • D. Mason, Associate Professor, Department of English
  • E. Ritter, Graduate Program Director & Professor of Linguistics. School of Languages, Linguistics, Literatures & Cultures

Moderator: Kendell Heydon, Coordinator, Writing Support Services, Student Success Centre

Time: 1:10 – 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Have you ever wondered what journal editors are looking for or what to expect going through the publishing process? Get the inside scoop on getting published in peer-reviewed journals in STEM. Featuring a panel of distinguished faculty with extensive knowledge and experience in academic publishing, this online session will share examples of the issues that stop a paper from making it to the peer-review stage, what kinds of writing engage reviewers as well as practical advice (e.g., how to select which journal to submit to, how to handle harsh feedback from reviewers).

In this session, students will have the opportunity to ask questions to panellists. If you would like to submit questions in advance, please email them to wconline@ucalgary.ca

Panellists:

  • Dr. Philip Egberts (Associate Professor, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering)
  • Dr. Tanya Beran (Professor, Community Health Sciences)
  • Dr. Cathryn Ryan (Professor, Department of Geoscience)

Research

Time: 10:10 – 11:10 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Literature reviews are a common task in graduate work, either as part of the background section of a larger paper/thesis, or as a standalone publication. This session will provide you with tips and resources for how to plan, research, and manage your literature for a literature review.

Presented by: Heather Ganshorn, MLIS. Associate Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources

Time: Noon – 1 p.m. MDT
Platform: In-person (TFDL 440A)

In this demonstration, we present the basics of how to use Tableau, a tool capable of creating a wide variety of data visualizations. Tableau (http://www.tableausoftware.com) supports of variety of data formats and through simple interactions allows fast exploration to find the visualization most suited to the data. Tableau offers its desktop software free to post-secondary students.

Presented by: John Brosz, PhD., Visualization Coordinator, Libraries and Cultural Resources

No session recording or materials available.

Time: 1:10– 2:40 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

The R statistical data analysis language is a standard tool throughout academia. This workshop will provide a brief demonstration of the basics of loading data sets, preparing data for analysis, performing a statistical analysis, and visualizing data. This analysis will be demonstrated on a laptop computer in RStudio. Expanding on this, the workshop will introduce using R at the Linux command line and how this relates to high-performance computing. Finally, the workshop will introduce the consulting services provided by Research Computing Services, as well as the high-performance research computing cluster (ARC), secure data storage (SCDS), secure data analysis tools (DAT), and secure computing cluster (MARC).

Presented by: Tannistha Nandi, PhD, and Ian Percel, PhD, data scientists with Research Computing Services

Wellbeing

Time: 10:10 – 11:40 a.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

Many graduate students experience difficulties with their relationships with their supervisors at some point throughout graduate school. It can be very stressful when there is conflict within the student-supervisor relationship as this relationship can have a significant impact on well-being and academic progress. This session will provide students with tools and ideas for navigating these relationships, preventing problems, and reducing the impact of problems that currently exist.

Time: Noon – 1 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

This session is an introduction and discussion about mindfulness. We will practice two mindfulness meditations. In this session, students will be given a brief introduction to mindfulness including a brief talk and question and answer. Students will practice one grounding exercise and one meditation.

Presented by: Kelsey McWilliams, Registered Social Work. Distance Support Advisor, Student Wellness Services, University of Calgary

No session recording or materials available.

Time: 3 – 4:15 p.m. MDT
Platform: Zoom

In the past two years, this pandemic has exposed serious challenges to our mental health system. This has been especially tough for graduate students, who’ve had to adapt to various learning environments – both online and in-person – without previous knowledge to work upon. As our campus comes back together, it’s more important than ever to talk openly about mental health and wellness.

In this panel, we will engage in a thoughtful discussion with four graduate students, on their own experiences navigating graduate school during this unprecedented time. Through this conversation, we hope to give representation to graduate students who are thriving in their own mental health and wellness.

Due to the personal nature of this session, no recording is available.