Main campus

The hub of academic, recreational, residential and student activities at the University of Calgary. 

Built in the 1960s, our main campus has been evolving ever since, and is now home to 11 of our 14 faculties, our world-class research and athletics facilities, and extensive support services for students, faculty and staff. Located in Calgary's northwest quadrant, the campus occupies more than 200 hectares — an area larger than the city's downtown.

The buildings for Sciences, Engineering, Biology, Social Sciences and Kinesiology make up the northern side of campus, while professional faculties including Education, Environmental Design, Nursing, Social Work, Business, and Law are on the south side, along with residence facilities for thousands of students and Hotel Alma, our on-campus haven for guests. 

Fine Arts and Humanities facilities include the Art Building, Craigie Hall, and various performance theatres can be found near the main entrance and in the heart of campus, the Taylor Family Digital Library, the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, and the MacEwan Student Centre serve as hubs of scholarly and leisure activity.

Main Campus

2500 University Dr NW
Calgary, AB, Canada
T2N 1N4

Map (PDF)

The Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning

Dedicated to better understanding and improving student learning, the Taylor Institute brings together teaching development, teaching and learning research, and undergraduate inquiry learning under one roof. It's the first in Canada dedicated solely to improving postsecondary teaching and learning. Completed in 2016, the building was designed with three guiding principles: flexibility, transparency and collaboration. Its learning spaces are fully flexible and infused with technology, allowing instructors and students to experiment with advanced teaching and learning approaches. Located at the heart of campus, it supports the institute’s work to build communities and grow networks.

The Olympic Oval

Built for the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics, the Oval was the first covered speed skating oval in North America, and the first to be used at Winter Olympics. With at least a dozen world records broken under its domed roof, the Oval is renowned for having the Fastest Ice on Earth and is a preferred training facility for speed skating teams across the globe. Along with a 400-metre long-track speed skating oval, the facility has two international-sized ice rinks for short-track speed skating and ice hockey, as well as a 450-metre running track and a 110-metre sprint track for year-round athletics training. The Oval is currently the official designated training centre for Speed Skate Canada and the Canadian National Speed Skating team.