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Sociology professor recognized as one of 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women

Amal Madibbo honoured for her academic and community work plus pioneering migration
July 15, 2016
University of Calgary sociology professor Amal Madibbo accepts her award from Ontario Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell as one of 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women. Photo courtesy of Amal Madibbo

University of Calgary sociology professor Amal Madibbo accepts her award from Ontario Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell as one of 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women. Photo courtesy of Amal Madibbo 

Amal Madibbo, associate professor in the Department of Sociology, was recently honoured as one of 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women at a gala in Toronto.

The 100 women, acknowledged for their achievements and contributions to Canadian life, are also featured in a new publication, entitled 100 Accomplished Black Canadian Women — 2016, which features a forward by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Trudeau praises the project for documenting “the groundbreaking achievements of Black Canadian women … highlight(ing) their role in shaping our diverse and prosperous country.”

Madibbo, whose research expertise lies in the areas of immigration, globalization, ethnicity and race relations, was recognized on a number of fronts going back to her successful migration from Sudan, which made her the first Sudanese woman to immigrate to Canada on her own.

Upon completing her graduate studies in Toronto and Ottawa, Madibbo went on to establish herself as a researcher and teacher at the University of Calgary, with numerous publications and international conference speaking engagements to her name.

Strengthening ties between Canada and Sudan

She has also distinguished herself for her tireless community work with immigrants to Canada, primarily within the Sudanese and Francophone communities, helping them better integrate culturally in their new country. Madibbo also travels back to Sudan every year, working with universities in Darfur and the Khartoum region, and helping to strengthen ties between those institutions and the University of Calgary.

“I feel very appreciated to be included among these 100 wonderful women,” says Madibbo. “Blacks are one of the communities that have made significant contributions to the building of this great Canadian nation and society. And this group of women have contributed and achieved so much, from engineering and politics to medicine and teaching.”

She adds: “In fact, the woman who started this valuable initiative is the Honourable Dr. Jean Augustine, a former Ontario fairness commissioner and and ex-Liberal MP and minister who once served as a parliamentary secretary to former Prime Minister Jean Chretien. She was the first black woman to be a member of Canadian parliament and a House speaker.”

“This is a group that has contributed so much, yet been marginalized. So it is important that their contributions to Canada be recognized in this official way.”

Madibbo accepted the award at the June 16 gala affair in Toronto from Ontario Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell.

See the full list of the 100 Accomplished Black Candian Women here.