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Grad Success Week - May 2-4, 2017

Network with other graduate students while enhancing your research, writing, presentation, and time-management skills during this three-day event.

This summer, count on being productive. Grad Success Week offers three days of seminars and events designed to help graduate students prepare and focus on their important research projects. The summertime is the perfect time to get down to business, and this week of free events will ensure you’re set up for success.

Grad Success Week offers something for every graduate student:

  • Keynote address
  • Hear from faculty on how to get published
  • Complete four Writing at the Graduate Level courses in just three days
  • Learn strategies to improve reading, research and presentations
  • Build confidence and learn to manage stress by attending Wellness workshops
  • Network with professionals, academics and your peers
  • Attend an address by the Dean and Associate Dean of FGS
  • ...Enjoy FREE food!

Keynote

Keynote: Michele Jacobsen (Associate Dean- Graduate Programs Werklund School of Education)
Date Time Location
Tues, May 2 9:30-10:20am Blue Room - Dining Centre

Keynote: Building Connections to Thrive in Graduate School 

Michele Jacobsen is the Associate Dean, Graduate Programs in Education, Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary. She provides academic leadership of research and professional graduate programs that engage over 1200 doctoral and masters students. As a Professor in the Learning Sciences, Michele uses design-based research approaches to study technology-enabled learning, peer mentorship and responsive pedagogy in school and post-secondary classrooms. Michele draws upon the learning sciences in studying the design of participatory learning environments that sponsor knowledge building, intellectual engagement and assessment as learning.

Breakfast and coffee hosted by Faculty of Graduate Studies


Meals

Breakfast and Coffee Hosted by Faculty of Graduate Studies
Date Time Location
Tue, May 2 8:30-9:20am Blue Room - Dining Centre

Enjoy breakfast, coffee, and networking time before the Grad Success Week events begin. Stick around afterward for Michele Jacobsen's keynote address.

Tea and Coffee Hosted by Faculty of Graduate Studies
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 8:30-8:50am TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom & TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Enjoy tea, coffee, and networking time before the day's events.

Lunch hosted by Libraries and Cultural Resources
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 12:30-1:20pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Pizza lunch provided at 12pm in the Grad Commons. Please register.

Social Hosted by Graduate Students Association
Date Time Location
Thur, May 4 3:00-5:00pm Last Defence Lounge

Celebrate an incredible few days of learning with appetizers and another networking opportunity from your Graduate Students Association.


Panels

FGS Graduate Student Panel: Myth-busting and the Truth about Grad School
Date Time Location
Tue, May 2 10:30-11:50am Blue Room - Dining Centre

This panel of current students and recent grads will share their experiences around the highs and lows of completing a graduate degree. This session aims to foster a safe space to discuss and normalize some of the most common beliefs and experiences of grad students and offers peer advice and strategies for working through challenges toward success.

Panelists:

TBD

Ethics Research
Date Time Location
Tue, May 2 1:30-2:50pm TFDL Grad Commons - 5th Floor

TBD

Articles that get Published: Science and Engineering
Date Time Location
Thurs, May 4 1:00-2:20pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Have you ever wondered what journal editors are looking for? Get the inside scoop on publishing in peer-reviewed journals in Science and Engineering. This session will feature a panel of distinguished faculty who will share their knowledge and experience in academic publishing. Hear their thoughts on academic publishing from a journal editor’s perspective, including what stops a paper from making it to peer-review and what kinds of writing engage reviewers.

Panelists:

Leland Jackson (Department of Biological Sciences) focuses on the stability of aquatic communities and ecosystems, and relationships between sustainable growth and water quality and quantity. He is also the Scientific Director of Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets, a research infrastructure project that seeks to develop and test new wastewater treatment technologies. 

Robin Yates (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) completed his Bachelor of Science with a major in microbiology in 1999 and a Bachelor of Veterinary Science with first class honors and a University Medal in 2001. With a Fulbright Postgraduate Scholarship, he completed a PhD with Prof. David G. Russell in the field of Comparative Biomedical Science at Cornell University, New York, USA. Since his academic appointment, Dr. Yates has been awarded an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Independent Investigator Award and a CIHR New Investigator Award to conduct research into phagosomal biology of antigen presenting cells. Dr. Yates also acts as the Associate Dean (Student) in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Calgary.

Chan Wirasinghe (Department of Civil Engineering) has been a professor at the University of Calgary's Department of Civil Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering, since 1976. He served for 12.5 years as the Dean of Engineering at the University of Calgary. He worked closely with the Department of Geology and Geophysics at that time. He is currently a member of the Council of NSERC, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (an Order-in-Council appointment). He also serves on Camp 18 of the Corporation of Seven Wardens. He is member of APEGGA Council, and the Strategic Planning Committee of Council. He is the Canadian member on the Committee on Disaster Risk Management (CDRM) of the World Federation of Engineering Organizations (WFEO) and former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Advanced Transportation.

Donna-Marie McCafferty (Department of Physiology and Pharmacology) investigates the role of white blood cells in causing macroscopic/histological and epithelial permeability changes in various inflammatory models e.g. in response to bacterial products (LPS) and in experimental models of colitis. She also investigates the mechanisms (adhesion molecules) used by leukocytes to leave the blood stream and enter gut tissue. 

 

Articles that get Published: Arts and Social Sciences
Date Time Location
Thurs, May 4 1:00-2:20pm TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

Have you ever wondered what journal editors are looking for? Get the inside scoop on getting published in peer-reviewed journals in the Arts and Social Sciences. Featuring a panel of distinguished faculty with extensive knowledge and experience in academic publishing, this session will offer a journal editor’s perspective on what stops a paper from making it to the peer-review stage, and what kinds of writing engage reviewers.

Panelists:

Dr. Maureen Hiebert (Department of Political Science) is a member of The Consortium for Peace Studies and the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies. She has published extensively in the field of Comparative Genocide Theory and is co-editor of Genocide Studies International.

Dr. Michael Tavel Clarke (Department of English) researches American literature and culture, with a focus on theories of the body and gender studies. He is a co-editor of ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature.

Dr. Loren Falkenberg (Haskayne School of Business) is an award-winning scholar publishing on ethical and social responsibilities of corporations. She has consulted on several corporate social responsibility programs and is an editor for The Journal of Business Ethics.

Dr. Faye Halpern (Department of English) specializes in nineteenth-century American women authors and their rhetorical practices is a co-editors of ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature. She recently published an article called “10 Tips for Getting Published” for Inside Higher Ed (see 10 Tips for Getting Published - Halpern )

Annette Timm (Department of History) is an editor for the Journal of the History of Sexuality. She specializes and has published extensively in the field of European and German history with a focus on the history of gender and sexuality.


Writing at the Graduate Level

Strategies for Writing Literature Reviews
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 1:00-2:20pm TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

A literature review is more than a series of summaries. While each discipline's literature varies, all disciplines expect a literature review to present a synthesis of current knowledge. This workshop focuses on strategies and approaches that all students can use to organize their literature, draft their review, and revise their review. Key features of the workshop include effectively gathering a body of research, criteria for selecting literature, and approaches for organizing literature reviews.

Academic Integrity and Using Sources Effectively
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 9:00-10:20am TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Being a graduate student means being on the cutting edge of research, and properly acknowledging sources is as important as the research itself. In this informal panel discussion, we will explore and unpack the institutional definition of academic integrity and provide participants with a variety of strategies to prevent unintentional plagiarism while researching, writing and revising written work. Key topics covered will include note-taking and reading strategies for writing effective summaries of scholarly articles, paraphrasing research, and common sentence patterns used to discuss existing research or literature.

Panelists:

Dr. Christopher Fuller is a Research Associate for the Departments of Geography and Engineering, and a Writing Advisor for both the Writing Support and RWRD ESL programs at the Student Success Center, at the University of Calgary. His MSc and PhD research was primarily funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canadian Foundation for innovation (CFI), and the Artic Institute of North America (AINA), with additional support from several other institutional, provincial, and international grants and scholarships.

Dr. Robin Yates BSc., BVSc.(hons), PhD. Robin Yates completed his Bachelor of Science with a major in microbiology in 1999 and a Bachelor of Veterinary Science with first class honors and a University Medal in 2001. With a Fulbright Postgraduate Scholarship, he completed a PhD with Prof. David G. Russell in the field of Comparative Biomedical Science at Cornell University, New York, USA. Since his academic appointment, Dr. Yates has been awarded an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Independent Investigator Award and a CIHR New Investigator Award to conduct research into phagosomal biology of antigen presenting cells. Dr. Yates also acts as the Associate Dean (Student) in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Calgary.

Strategies for Developing Research Proposals
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 10:30-11:50am TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

This session provides strategies on developing appropriate research questions, conceptualizing information surrounding a topic, and selecting a project scope that matches your time frame. While noting differences across disciplines, this workshop discusses strategies students can use to begin the planning and drafting of a research proposal. Key features of the workshop include developing preliminary research questions, creating coherence between parts of the proposal, and revising for errors that prompt confusion or misreading. Please note that this session does not provide information related to preparing proposals for scholarship/funding applications.

Critical Thinking and Scholarly Writing
Date Time Location
Thurs, May 4 9:00-10:20am TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

This workshop will help students understand the structure of academic argumentation through claims, evidence and warrants. We will also consider a few critical thinking themes that form the blueprint for all academic writing. These include critiquing a position based on context/point of view, strength of evidence, flaws in reasoning and underlying epistemological assumptions. Students will have a chance to connect these themes to their own research.

Revising and Editing
Date Time Location
Thurs, May 4 2:30-3:50pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Most students review, rewrite, and edit their documents (often more than they like to admit). This workshop will help students structure their revision process to become more effective at revising their documents. The workshop addresses various writing processes to help students become attuned to where they are most likely to make mistakes. Students are also encouraged to develop their own revision checklist, based on their experience with their own writing, as the workshop covers organizational, sentence-level, and surface level errors.

Developing Effective Organization Strategies for Technical Writing
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 3:30-4:50pm TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

The efficient and effective organization of one’s ideas is of paramount importance in technical writing, particularly in engineering and computer science.  This presentation directly tackles a few key issues that graduate students face when planning and writing a thesis or dissertation.  The topics covered will include: developing a focused thesis statement; using a “funnel” approach to organize a thesis or dissertation; and writing a concise abstract that employs crucial argumentative moves required in engineering, computer science and other fields.  


Research, Reference, and Data Management

Research Project Management
Date Time Location
Tues, May 2 3:30-4:20pm TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

One of the greatest challenges faced by graduate students is the size and complexity of the dissertation, for which no previous academic work can have fully prepared them. In addition to the cognitive challenge of giving coherent form to such a mass of material, there are the closely interrelated time-management and motivational challenges associated with a large project. In this seminar, we will look at the principles of project management, one of the most powerful tools for addressing these challenges. Presenter: Paul Papin (Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre).

Data Management
Date Time Location
Tues, May 2 3:30-4:20pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Learn about research data management. Research data, whether made up of spreadsheets, interview transcripts, image collections, digital records, or other material, will be crucial to your career as a graduate student and researcher. Properly managing this data you will save you time and headaches by ensuring your data is not accidentally lost while making your data easier to work with and verifying your research findings. This session will focus on how to manage your data before, during, and after your research, as well as describe how to use Data Management Plan Assistant, a Canadian online tool for creating data management plans. Presenters: John Brosz (Coordinator of Research Data and Visualization) and Paul Pival (Research Librarian - Data Analytics and Economics).

Reference Management
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 4:00-4:50pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

This session will provide an overview of the various reference management tools useful for organizing your references and formatting your papers/thesis.

Manage Your Research Identity and Track Your Impact
Date Time Location
Thurs, May 4 9:00-10:20am TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

How do you stand out in a crowded field of researchers? How can you present a coherent picture of your research and its impact when applying to postgraduate programs? This session shows you how to create researcher profiles in services like Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar, as well as to use surveys tools for analyzing the impact of your published research. Presenter: Christie Hurrell.

Know your rights! What’s happening in scholarly publishing
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 10:30-11:50am TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

As a graduate student and researcher you may be excited to get your work published; however, you may not be aware of the various publishing models available or what author rights you may want to retain in the publication process. Many researchers are surprised to learn that they may not be able to reuse their own published works in standard publishing contracts, whether it is through self-archiving or sharing with a colleague. It is important to consider these issues and have a plan to negotiate for rights prior to submitting for publication and signing a contract. Presenters: Rowena Johnson (Copyright Officer), Kathryn Ruddock (Manager, Digitization and Repository Services).


Wellness

Moving Beyond Conflict in Supervisory Relationships
Date Time Location
Tues, May 2 1:30-2:50pm TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom
The relationship with your graduate supervisor is one of the most important relationships in your academic career. However, sometimes conflict can occur in this relationship that can have a negative impact on your progression as a graduate student. For graduate students experiencing conflict with their supervisor, there are often strategies that can be utilized to overcome this conflict. This workshop is designed for graduate students wanting to learn how to address conflict in their supervisory relationships. You will learn effective communication skills to support constructive conflict resolution, explore processes and factors to contemplate if considering a change of supervisor, and strengthen strategies in taking care of yourself in high stress periods.
Harnessing Stress to Enhance Performance
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 1:00-2:20pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

This workshop will help students rethink their relationship to stress and use it as an asset in performance situations such as presentations and thesis defense.


Other Sessions

Time Management Discussion
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 2:30-3:20pm TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

Join in on a group discussion facilitated by an Academic Development Specialist from the Student Success Centre. In this session, you will have an opportunity to learn from your peers various time management and motivation strategies that work or that don't work, and together you will brainstorm strategies to help you stay on track! Facilitator: Carina Huggins (Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre).

Reading for Structure
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 2:30-3:50pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Tired of wandering through professional journal articles without a map? The Reading for Structure workshop will help you navigate the trickiest of articles even when the trail is unmarked. In addition to becoming more familiar with the clearly signposted sections of a paper—Methodology, Results, Discussion—you'll learn to clearly identify the research problem, its significance, justifications for the research, limitations on results, etc. Participants in this workshop will be shown examples of articles from various disciplines to consider. Presented by Paul Papin (Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre).

Professional Photos
Date Time Location
Tue, May 2 12:00-1:00pm TFDL 5th Floor - Grad Commons

Join us in the Grad Commons to receive a free professional head shot. This session will have limited space and will operate on a first come, first served basis. 

Presenting and Defending your Dissertation
Date Time Location
Thurs, May 4 10:30-11:50am TFDL 3rd Floor - Student Success Centre Classroom

Learn how to make an impression on academic and non-academic audiences alike. Become a master of gesture, tone, and PowerPoint! Presenter: Carina Huggins, (Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre).

Working Space: Scholarship Writing
Date Time Location
Wed, May 3 1:00-3:20pm TFDL Gallery Hall

TBD