University of Calgary : Mechanical Engineering ENME


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Graduate Studies Calendar 2018-2019 Courses of Instruction Course Descriptions M Mechanical Engineering ENME
Mechanical Engineering ENME

Instruction offered by members of the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in the Schulich School of Engineering.

Graduate Courses
Mechanical Engineering 603       Physical Fluid Dynamics
Physical phenomena of incompressible fluid motion for a variety of flows, e.g. pipe and channel flow, flow past a cylinder, and convection in horizontal layers. The derivation of the basic equations of fluid mechanics using Cartesian tensor notation. High and low Reynolds number flows including some solutions of the viscous flow equations, inviscid flow, and elementary boundary layer theory. Thermal free convective flows.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 605       Combustion Processes
Review of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics of combustion. Fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer in combustion phenomena. Autoignition and source ignition, flames and detonation. Quenching and explosion hazards, flammability and detonation limits. Heterogeneous combustion, combustion practical systems, combustion as affecting pollution and efficiency, some experimental combustion methods.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 607       Mechanics of Compressible Flow
One-dimensional steady and unsteady motion with application to the analysis of supersonic nozzles, diffusers, flow in conduits with friction, shock tubes. Two-dimensional flow of ideal fluid. Small perturbation theory, method of characteristics with application to design of supersonic nozzles. Waves in two-dimensional flow.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 613       Research Seminar I
Students will develop written and oral communication skills required to disseminate their technical research results and to receive formative feedback on performance.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3S-0)
NOT INCLUDED IN GPA
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Mechanical Engineering 615       Instrumentation
Basic principles relating to measurement systems. Static and dynamic characteristics of signals. Measurement system behaviour. Application of probability and statistics to measurement systems. Uncertainty analysis. Data acquisition and conversion,  analog/digital signals and associated sampling theory. Application of theory to various measurement systems such as pressure, velocity, strain, concentration, and temperature.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 619       Special Problems
Designed to provide graduate students, especially at the PhD level, with the opportunity of pursuing advanced studies in particular areas under the direction of a faculty member. Students would be required to consider problems of an advanced nature.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Consent of the Department.
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Mechanical Engineering 620       Geomatics Engineering for Pipeline Systems
Provides both the classical basis to geomatics as a powerful tool in the design and management of pipelines as well as the cutting-edge view of the discipline as a digital technology.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 619.10 and 620 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 622       Pump and Compressor Stations
Provides a comprehensive overview of the design, performance and operation of pump and compressor stations for pipeline applications. Other topics consist of SCADA operation, station valve operation, asset management, condition monitoring and equipment reliability.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 622 and 619.11 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 624       Fundamentals of Pipeline Economics
Provides students with a fundamental understanding of engineering economics, including decision-making processes and life-cycle assessment in application to pipeline systems.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 624 and 619.12 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 626       Corrosion Science in the Pipelines Industry
Overview of corrosion in the pipeline industry with emphasis on the underlying science, including thermodynamics and kinetics of electrochemical processes, corrosion prevention and mitigation by materials selection, inhibition, coatings and cathodic protection. Implications for integrity management will also be discussed.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 626 and 619.12 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 628       Pipeline Coatings
Introduction to the fundamental properties and structure of coatings, as well as applications in the pipeline industry. Applications of coating technology in integrity maintenance of the various structural facilities. Computer assisted coatings project management programs will be introduced.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 628 and 619.27 will not be allowed
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Mechanical Engineering 630       Fundamentals of Liquid Hydraulics in Pipeline Systems
Introduction to the fundamentals of liquid hydraulics in pipeline systems. Topics include petroleum fluids, design elements and economics, mechanical design, fluid mechanics fundamentals, pipeline hydraulics, isothermal flow, pumping requirements, centrifugal and reciprocating pumps, operations and maintenance design, and design optimization.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 630 and 619.49 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 631       Numerical Methods for Engineers
Introduction, mathematical modelling, sources of errors in the process of numerical analysis and solution methodology; Elements of numerical analysis, Taylor series, round-off error, truncation error, concept of stability, consistency and convergence; Linear algebra, normal forms, Gauss elimination method, LU-decomposition, tridiagonal systems of equations; iterative methods, Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel, SOR, SSOR methods, conjugate gradient methods and preconditioning and principles of the multi-grid methods; Elliptic "equilibrium" equation, Laplace and Poisson equations, finite difference and finite control volume concepts and stability analysis; Parabolic equations: explicit, implicit and Crank-Nicolson methods, time-splitting method, method of lines, Stability analysis; Hyperbolic equations; Introduction to other methods; future challenging problems.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 632       Fundamentals of Gas Hydraulics in Pipeline Systems
Applications of fundamental fluid mechanics concepts to pipelines conveying compressible media (gases). Strategies for describing the gas-dynamics of pipeline systems and networks are developed, as well as the influence of gas properties and pipeline operating characteristics on component selection and operating parameters.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 632 and 619.40 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 633       Mathematical Techniques for Engineers
Application of mathematical techniques to the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations arising in engineering problems. Methods that will be considered are: separation of variables, method of characteristics, transform methods and complex variable methods.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 634       Pipeline Geotechnical Engineering
Introduction to applications of geotechnical engineering in design and construction of oil and gas pipelines. Geohazard assessment and mitigation methods and issues around pipe/soil interaction will be discussed, as well as the relevant codes, standards and industry guidelines for pipelines.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 634 and 619.57 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 636       Structural Analysis of Buried Steel Pipeline Systems
An introduction to stress analysis of buried pipelines through hand calculations, spreadsheets, and stress analysis software. Pipeline code requirements are discussed. Individual practices and industry examples are used.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 636 and 619.67 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 637       Thermal Systems Analysis
Fundamentals of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and combustion; Modelling of thermophysical properties; Second law of thermodynamics, concept of entropy generation and exergy analysis; Minimizing environmental impact; Advanced design and analysis of heat exchangers, co-generation, renewable energy systems, and propulsion systems.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Also known as:
(Environmental Engineering 673)
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Mechanical Engineering 638       Failure and Fracture Mechanics in the Pipeline Industry
Covers the basic theory of failure and fracture mechanics in sufficient depth to allow its application to pipeline design, material requirements and integrity assessment. Overview of brittle and ductile fracture, fatigue and environmental processes, design basics, fracture mechanics theory, fracture mechanics testing, inspection issues, material issues, crack propagation and arrest, fitness for purpose methods, structural integrity assessment and material requirements.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 638 and 619.74 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 639       Numerical Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics
Review of solution techniques for ordinary differential equations. Stability, consistency and convergence. Order of accuracy. Fourier methods for stability. Numerical techniques for one-, two- and three-dimensional linear parabolic problems. Courant condition. Implicit and semi-implicit schemes. Boundary conditions for parabolic problems. Techniques for linear hyperbolic problems. CFL condition. Characteristics, domain of dependence and domain of influence. Boundary conditions for hyperbolic problems. Non-linear conservation laws. The Burger's equation as a test problem. Strong and weak solutions. Conservative and integral forms. Conservative schemes. Entropy condition. Godunov theorem and flux limiters. Godunov, ENO and TVD schemes. Implementation in gas dynamics.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 640       Stress Corrosion Cracking of Materials
Fundamentals of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials and the factors contributing to SCC from environmental, metallurgical and mechanical sources. Various testing techniques to study and/or evaluate SCC will also be discussed.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 640 and 619.90 will not be allowed.
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Mechanical Engineering 641       Advanced Control Systems
Introduction to multivariable systems; state space models; analysis of linear systems; stability; Cayley-Hamilton theorem; controllability and observability; state feedback control; pole placement designs; introduction to linear optimal control and estimation; Kalman filtering; separation theorem and duality; performance specifications; controller reduction concepts; introduction to robust control.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 643       Optimal and Adaptive Control
Discrete time and sampled-data system models and properties; discrete time domain controller design principles; system identification using least-squares analysis; self-tuning control; indirect adaptive control; model reference adaptive control; sliding mode control in continuous and discrete time; optimal design of sliding mode controllers; sensitivity functions and their role in control theoretic performance specification; robust stability and robust performance objectives; Kharitonov stability.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 650       Mobile Robotics
Overview of unmanned vehicles, mobile robot locomotion systems, wheeled rovers, walking machines, mobile-manipulators, mobile robot sensors and actuators, simulation, modelling and analysis of mobile robot behaviour, robot-environment interaction analysis, 2D navigation techniques and localization, mobile robot simulation tools.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Mechanical Engineering 505.
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Mechanical Engineering 653       Advanced Continuum Mechanics
Review of linear algebra and tensor analysis; kinematics of the deformation; deformation and strain tensors; strain rates; balance equations and equations of motion; stress principle; stress power and conjugated stress-strain couples; stress rates; elements of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics for discrete and continuum systems; thermomechanics and constitutive theory; isotropic and anisotropic hyperelasticity; composite materials.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 660       Mechatronics Design Laboratory
A hands-on laboratory experience in the design and analysis of microprocessor-controlled electro-mechanical components. Laboratory projects in which teams will configure, design, and implement mechatronic systems. Aliasing, quantization, electronic feedback, power amplifiers, digital logic, encoder interfacing, and motor control leading to prototyping and design of commercially viable products. Lectures will cover comparative surveys, operational principles, and integrated design issues associated with mechanical, electrical and control components.
Course Hours:
6 units; F(0-3)
Also known as:
(Mechanical Engineering 560)
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Mechanical Engineering 663       Advanced Muscle Mechanics and Physiology
A look at problems associated within muscle mechanics and contractility. Also the use of muscle mechanics as a scientific discipline to critically learn and evaluate the scientific process. Basic anatomy and physiology of muscle contraction including the cross-bridge theory, and the force-length, force-velocity and force-time relationships of actively and passively contracting muscles will also be covered.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Consent of the Faculty.
Also known as:
(Medical Science 663)(Kinesiology 663)
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Mechanical Engineering 665       Elements of Materials Engineering
Covers a variety of material aspects and provides a fundamental understanding of Materials Science and Engineering. Emphasizes the understanding of advanced dislocation theory and its application in illustration of diffusion, deformation and fracture of metals. Fundamentals of material strengthening mechanisms are covered. Practical aspects that are relevant to material uses and failures, such as environmental-induced cracking, creep, fatigue, strain aging and corrosion, are discussed. Typical surface analysis techniques for material characterization are introduced.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 667       Fracture Mechanics
Basic fracture theory, failure criteria, overview of fracture mechanics, brittle and ductile failure, crack tip parameters, geometric considerations, methods of analysis, fracture toughness and testing standards. Applications in design, fatigue subcritical crack growth, creep and impact.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 669       Fatigue of Materials
History and origin of fatigue. Stress life, strain life and fracture mechanics approaches. Low and high cycle fatigue. Low and high temperature fatigue. Combined stresses, initiation, and propagation of cracks. Environmental and statistical effects. Testing techniques and variables. Design and specific material behaviour. Mechanisms of fatigue.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 683       Applications of 3D Rigid Body Mechanics in Biomechanics
Applications of 3D motion analysis and rigid body mechanics to musculoskeletal system locomotion, and movement. Experimental, theoretical and numerical methods for optical motion imaging, 3D analysis of joint kinematics and kinetics, joint angle representations, prediction of joint forces, data analysis and filtering, error propagation, inverse and forward dynamics approaches, and applications to clinical and orthopaedic engineering.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Mechanical Engineering 685       Biomechanics of Human Movement
Introduction to the measuring methods (accelerometry, goniometry, film and film analysis, video systems) of biomechanical analysis of human movement (force and force distribution). Description of the mechanical properties of bone, tendon, ligaments, cartilage, muscles and soft tissues. The relation between structure and function of biomaterials. Introduction to descriptive analysis of human movement.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Consent of the Faculty.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Mechanical Engineering 685 and either Medical Science 685 or Kinesiology 685 will not  be allowed.
Also known as:
(Medical Science 685)
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Mechanical Engineering 698       Graduate Project
Individual project in the student's area of specialization under the guidance of the student's supervisor. A written proposal, one or more written progress reports, and a final written report are required. An oral presentation is required upon completion of the course. Open only to students in the MEng (courses only) program.
Course Hours:
6 units; F(0-4)
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Mechanical Engineering 708       Turbulence
Provides an overview of turbulence in incompressible flows of Newtonian fluids. Topics include: the nature of turbulence; classical methods of analysis (Reynolds-averaging, spectral representations); the concept of scales; a review of isotropic and homogeneous turbulence; the energy cascade and the role of vorticity in turbulence canonical flows: boundary layers, jets, wakes and mixing layers; modern views of turbulence including coherent motions and inter-scale energy transfer.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(4-0)
Notes:
Students are expected to be familiar with basic mathematical concepts including vector calculus, Gauss’ theorem, Cartesian tensor notation, and basic fluid mechanical concepts, such as wakes, boundary layers, and jets. Basic knowledge in continuum mechanics is an asset.
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Mechanical Engineering 713       Research Seminar II
Students will develop written and oral communication skills required to disseminate their technical research results and to receive formative feedback on performance.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3S-0)
NOT INCLUDED IN GPA
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