University of Calgary : Chemistry CHEM


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University of Calgary Calendar 2018-2019 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION Course Descriptions C Chemistry CHEM
Chemistry CHEM

Instruction offered by members of the Department of Chemistry in the Faculty of Science.

Students interested in taking Chemistry courses are urged to read the advice in the Faculty of Science Program section of this Calendar. Students taking Chemistry courses which have a laboratory component are required to provide evidence that they have successfully completed the Chemical Laboratory Safety Course for Undergraduates prior to the first laboratory class. Students who have not completed this course at some time during their undergraduate program will not be allowed into the laboratory until they do so. Information about this course is available from the Chemistry Undergraduate Office (SA 229), email address: chem.undergrad@ucalgary.ca, or at https://www.ucalgary.ca/chem/undergraduate/current_students/academics.

Junior Courses
Chemistry 201       General Chemistry: Structure and Bonding
An introduction to university chemistry from theoretical and practical perspectives, that focuses on an exploration of the fundamental links between electronic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure and the interactions of molecules using inorganic and organic examples.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-.75T-3/2)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 30 (or Continuing Education - Chemistry 2) and one of Mathematics 30-1 or Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 2 (offered by Continuing Education).
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 201 and any of 209, 211 or 301 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Chemistry 201 is not a prerequisite for Chemistry 203. Chemistry 201 and Chemistry 203 may be taken in any order. Mathematics 31 is strongly recommended.
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Chemistry 203       General Chemistry: Change and Equilibrium
An introduction to university chemistry from theoretical and practical perspectives that focuses on an exploration of the fundamental links between kinetics, equilibria and thermodynamics and explores acidity/basicity and redox behaviour using inorganic and organic examples.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-.75T-3/2)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 30 (or Continuing Education - Chemistry 2) and one of Mathematics 30-1 or Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 2 (offered by Continuing Education).
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 203 and any of 209, 213 or 301 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Chemistry 201 is not a prerequisite for Chemistry 203. Chemistry 201 and 203 may be taken in any order. Mathematics 31 is strongly recommended.
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Chemistry 209       General Chemistry for Engineers
Basic chemical concepts. Atomic and molecular structure. Chemical bonding. Chemical kinetics and equilibria. Acid-base and solubility equilibria. Oxidation-reduction phenomena and electrochemistry. The chemistry of water. The chemistry of energy sources. Basic environmental issues.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3/2)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 30 (or Continuing Education - Chemistry 2) and one of Mathematics 30-1 or Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 2 (offered by Continuing Education).
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 209 and any of 201, 203, 211, 213 and 301 will not be allowed. Mathematics 31 is strongly recommended.
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Chemistry 211       Foundations of Chemistry: Structure and Bonding
Same core topics as Chemistry 201 but taught with a greater emphasis on critical thinking, scientific observation and problem solving and the application of chemistry to topics such as drug design and environmental issues.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-3)
Prerequisite(s):
A grade of 80 per cent or higher in Chemistry 30 (or a grade of "B+" or higher in Continuing Education - Chemistry 2) and one of Mathematics 30-1 or Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 2(offered by Continuing Education).
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 211 and any of 201, 209 or 301 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Strongly recommended for students majoring in Chemistry and other students with strong backgrounds in chemistry. Mathematics 31 is strongly recommended.
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Chemistry 213       Foundations of Chemistry: Change and Equilibrium
Same core topics as Chemistry 203 but taught with a greater emphasis on critical thinking, scientific observation and problem solving and the application of chemistry to topics such as materials, explosives and medicine.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 213 and any of 203, 209 or 301 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Strongly recommended for students majoring in Chemistry and other students with strong backgrounds in chemistry.
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Senior Courses

Note: In all senior courses in Chemistry with a laboratory component, a charge will be levied for excessive breakage of glassware or equipment.

Chemistry 301       The Chemical World
The focus is on developing a general awareness and appreciation of the chemistry all around us; where chemical principles are surveyed in a variety of current and everyday contexts.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Not open to students in Honours, Majors or Minors in Chemistry programs, or to Environmental Science and Natural Sciences students with concentrations in Chemistry. Credit for Chemistry 301 and any of 201, 203, 209, 211 or 213 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Some previous exposure to chemistry, e.g. Chemistry 20, is strongly recommended. This course will not serve as a prerequisite for senior chemistry courses.
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Chemistry 311       Analytical Chemistry: Quantitative Analysis
Lectures: Principles and practice of precision measurement in chemistry. Statistical treatment of data. Acid-base and oxidation-reduction equilibria. Complexometric analysis. Laboratory: Quantitative analysis of organic and inorganic materials.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-4)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213; and one of Mathematics 249, 251, 265, 275 or Applied Mathematics 217.
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Chemistry 315       Analytical Chemistry: Introductory Instrumental Analysis
Lectures: Principles and practice of instrumental measurements for the quantitative determination of substances. Spectroscopic analysis. Analytical separations: liquid-liquid extraction, solid phase extraction, chromatography. Electrochemical methods: potentiometry, voltammetry, coulometry. Automated methods of analysis. Laboratory: Quantitative analysis of organic and inorganic materials using simple instrumental techniques.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-4)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 311.
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Chemistry 321       Environmental Chemistry
A survey course of major aspects of environmental chemistry including the natural chemical cycles in the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere and the consequences of anthropogenic disturbances to these cycles. Topics discussed will include: Aquatic Chemistry and water pollution. Atmospheric Chemistry and its alteration. Soil Chemistry and the fate of pollutants. Hazardous waste. Toxicological Chemistry.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
One of Chemistry 203, 209 or 213.
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Chemistry 331       Inorganic Chemistry: Main Group Elements
Lectures: The structure of many-electron atoms. Bonding, stereochemistry and symmetry in inorganic compounds. Solid-state science and aspects of inorganic solution chemistry. The chemistry of the main group elements. Laboratory: Applications of chemical principles to inorganic synthetic and qualitative analytical problems.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213.
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Chemistry 333       Inorganic Chemistry: Transition Metals
Lectures: Bonding models for metals and for transition metal compounds. Interpretation of redox and thermodynamic properties based on ligand field theory. Co-ordination and organometallic compounds of the transition metals. Metal complexes as catalysts in industry and biology. Laboratory: Synthesis, analysis, and physical investigations of transition metal compounds which illustrate their important properties.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213; and 331.
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Chemistry 351       Organic Chemistry I
An introduction to Organic Chemistry from a mechanistic perspective. Structure, bonding, and function, e.g. physical properties and reactivity. Stereochemistry; kinetics and thermodynamics. Spectroscopy (nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, ultra-violet/visible, and mass spectrometric techniques). Substitution and elimination reactions of saturated functional groups - the chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alcohols and their derivatives. Laboratory: Practical techniques.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 351 and 357 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Students are advised to take Chemistry 351 and 353 in consecutive terms.
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Chemistry 353       Organic Chemistry II
The concept and implications of aromaticity. The reactions of unsaturated functional groups via substitution, elimination and addition mechanisms - the chemistry of alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Laboratory: Characteristic functional group reactivity, synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 351.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 353 and either 355 or 357 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Students are advised to take Chemistry 351 and 353 in consecutive terms.
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Chemistry 355       Organic Chemistry II (for Chemists)
Mechanisms and synthetic applications of the reactions of alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and derivatives, and conjugated systems such as 1, 3-dienes and enones. The concept of aromaticity and its effect on chemical behaviour. Laboratory: Emphasis on organic synthesis and the methods of qualitative organic analysis.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213; and 351 and admission to the Chemistry major, Applied Chemistry major or Chemical Physics major.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 355 and either 353 or 357 will not be allowed.
Notes:
Open to students in other programs by consent of the Department. Students are advised to take Chemistry 351 and 355 in consecutive terms. Honours Biochemistry majors interested in taking this course should contact the Department of Chemistry regarding permission to enrol.
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Chemistry 357       Industrial Organic Chemistry for Engineers
The hybridization of the carbon atom and covalent bonding. Typical reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and industrial applications. Substitution; halogenation, nitration and oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons; polymerization and industrial applications. Functional groups and their reactions; oxidation, reduction, addition and elimination reactions, and industrial applications.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 209, or 201 or 211; and 203 or 213.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 357 and any of 351, 353 or 355 will not be allowed.
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Chemistry 371       Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics Chemistry
Lectures: A study of the states of matter. The basic laws of thermodynamics and their applications. Development of the concept of chemical potential. Changes of state and phase diagrams of pure substances and mixtures. Equilibrium electrochemistry. Laboratory: Experimental measurements, interpretations, and calculations relating to the topics discussed in lectures.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213; Physics 223 or 255; and one of Mathematics 253, 267, 277, 283 or Applied Mathematics 219.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 371 and any of Physics 347, 349, or 447 will not be allowed.
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Chemistry 373       Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry
Lectures: Elementary quantum mechanical treatment of the energy levels of atoms and molecules. Atomic spectra. Symmetry elements, operations, and point groups. Laboratory: Experimental measurements, interpretations, and calculations relating to the topics discussed in lectures.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213; Physics 223; and one of Mathematics 253, 267, 277, 283 or Applied Mathematics 219.
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Chemistry 379       Materials Chemistry for Engineers
An introduction to materials chemistry with industrial applications. Theories of chemical bonding and the relationship between chemical structure and observable properties. Chemical and physical properties of mixtures and interfaces. Structure and applications of polymers and soft materials. 
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 209, or 201 or 211; and 203 or 213.
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Chemistry 402       Introduction to Research in Chemistry

A chemistry-based research project under the supervision of an academic staff member.

402.01 – Introduction to Research in Chemistry I
402.02 – Introduction to Research in Chemistry II


Course Hours:
3 units; H(0-9)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 201 or 211; and 203 or 213; and consent of the Department.
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Chemistry 409       Applied Chemistry and Chemical Pathways for Engineers
Analysis of industrial chemical processes based on reaction pathways to infer system performance including co-product formation and the role of catalysts. Examples from oil, gas, coal and petrochemical processing.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 209 and 357.
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Chemistry 417       Modern Chromatographic Analysis
Fundamental concepts and methods of chromatographic separation science: Partition theory, sample preparation, chromatographic theory, gas and liquid chromatography, principles of detection. Emerging concepts such as micro-fluidic separation platforms, column technology and novel mobile phases.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 311 and 315.
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Chemistry 423       Green Chemistry: Principles and Techniques
Green Chemistry focuses on the science and techniques that chemists and chemical and process engineers use to generate less waste, and to develop products and processes that are more atom- and energy-efficient, environmentally sensitive, and cost-effective. A look at the principles behind green chemistry, some techniques and processes used in achieving atom- and energy-efficiency, and waste reduction.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 333 and one of 353 or 355; or Chemistry 357 and 409.
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Chemistry 425       Industrial Chemistry
Electrochemical processes and the applications of some of their products. Unit operations and reactor types in the chemical industry. Petroleum refining including heavy oil and bitumen. Industrial organic synthesis including monomers for subsequent polymerization. Design of specialized polymers.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 353 or 355.
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Chemistry 453       Advanced Organic Chemistry
Introduction to molecular orbital (MO) theory. Pericyclic reactions, the Woodward-Hoffmann rules. Photochemistry. Elucidation of reaction mechanism, and reactive intermediates. Laboratory: Multi-step synthesis and computer modelling of organic reactions.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-4)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 351 and one of Chemistry 353 or 355.
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Chemistry 471       Physical Chemistry: Kinetics and Spectroscopy
Vibrational, electronic and magnetic resonance spectra. Reaction kinetics and transport properties in the gas phase and in solution. Catalysis. Laboratory: Experimental measurements, interpretations, and calculations relating to the topics discussed in lectures.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 371 and 373.
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Chemistry 502       Research in Chemistry
Comprehensive research project under the direction of a staff member. A research report must be presented on completion of the course, and attendance at a weekly research seminar is expected.
Course Hours:
6 units; F(0-9)
Prerequisite(s):
Consent of the Department.
Notes:
It is recommended that students have completed the third year of their program in Chemistry, Applied Chemistry or Chemical Physics.
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Chemistry 515       Advanced Instrumental Analysis
Lectures: Fundamental aspects of modern instrumental methods. Spectroscopic methods: UV-visible and atomic absorption spectroscopy, flame and plasma emission methods. Chromatographic methods; liquid and gas chromatography. Mass spectrometry. Laboratory: Analysis of inorganic and organic samples using spectroscopic, electrochemical, and chromatographic instrumental methods.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-4)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 311 and 315.
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Chemistry 521       Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
An introduction to Tropospheric and Stratospheric Chemistry. The detailed chemistry of the stratosphere and troposphere. Gas-phase chemical kinetics. Photochemistry and atmospheric radiation. Aerosols. Anthropogenic pollution and air quality. Climate forcing. Introduction to modelling and atmospheric transport.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 315 and 373.
Notes:
Chemistry 471 is recommended as a prerequisite.
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Chemistry 531       Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I
Co-ordination and organometallic chemistry of the transition elements, incorporating the lanthanoids and actinoids. Fundamental and applied aspects, including characterization techniques, reaction mechanisms, catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 331, 333 and one of 353 or 355.
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Chemistry 533       Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II
Chemistry of the s- and p-block elements. Interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, vibrational and mass spectra. Fundamental concepts and industrial uses of inorganic heterocycles and polymers, electron-deficient and organometallic compounds. Solid-state chemistry.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 331, 333 and one of 353 or 355.
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Chemistry 535       Advanced Inorganic Laboratory
Advanced laboratory techniques for the synthesis and characterization of main group compounds, organometallics and solid-state materials using modern spectroscopic and structural methods. Includes a short project.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(1-8)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 331, 333 and 453 and admission to the Chemistry major, Applied Chemistry major or Chemical Physics major. 
Notes:
Open to students in other programs by consent of the Department.
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Chemistry 541       Concepts in Biochemical Toxicology
An interdisciplinary course focused on the diverse biomolecular mechanisms by which organic (e.g. PCB’s) and inorganic pollutants (e.g. Cd, Hg, As) adversely affect cell function examined at multiple levels of organization, from molecules to whole organisms. Topics include how natural toxins exert toxicity, how toxins/light generate free radicals within cells, how the speciation of metals in the environment affects their bioavailability/toxicity, and the toxicity mechanisms that lead to homeostatic dysfunction.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 311, 321, 351; and one of Biochemistry 341 or 393.
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 541 and either Chemistry 641 or Biochemistry 541 will not be allowed.
Also known as:
(Biochemistry 541)
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Chemistry 551       Organic Synthesis
Concepts and strategies of synthesizing molecules with emphasis on carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, protecting groups, chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 453.
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Chemistry 553       Bio-organic Chemistry
Organic chemistry applied to the understanding of biomolecules: Selected topics from carbohydrate, peptide/protein, lipid and nucleoside chemistry, enzyme inhibition and drug design.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 453.
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Chemistry 555       Advanced Organic Laboratory
Advanced laboratory techniques: Methods of purification and identification of products, purification of reagents, experimental design, working with air/moisture sensitive reagents. Includes a short research project.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(1-8)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 453 and admission to the Chemistry major, Applied Chemistry major or Chemical Physics major.
Notes:
Open to students in other programs by consent of the Department.
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Chemistry 559       Organic Spectroscopy
The instrumentation, theory and practical aspects of spectroscopy (e.g. UV/vis, MS, IR, 1H and 13C NMR including 2D-techniques). The emphasis will be on the application for structural elucidation through a problem solving approach.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 351 and one of 353 or 355.
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Chemistry 571       Physical Chemistry of Interfaces
The chemical and electrical nature, as well as basic thermodynamics, of interfaces. Surface films and aqueous interfaces, including micelles and bilayers. Interfaces involving solids such as metals and semiconductors. Absorption phenomena and surface catalysis. Survey of experimental approaches for interfacial studies.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 371 and 373.
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Chemistry 573       Nature of the Condensed Phase in Chemistry
Theoretical models of liquids and solids. Dielectric continuum, polarizabilities and magnetism. Ionic crystal, insulators, conductors, semiconductors and super conductors. Some aspects of scattering techniques for structure determination.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 371 and 373.
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Chemistry 575       Advanced Electronic Structure Theory
A discussion of the theories of modern electronic structure illustrated by applications to molecular structure and bonding, electronic spectroscopy, as well as chemical reactivity and dynamics.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-1T-3)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 371 and 373.
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Chemistry 579       Surface and Colloid Chemistry for Engineers
Introduces the fundamental and applied aspects of interfacial phenomena including capillarity, surface and interfacial tension, films, wetting and contact angles, adsorption, micellization, solubilization and emulsification. Examples drawn from colloids, foams, aerosols and macromolecules.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Chemistry 209; and 357 or 379; and Chemical Engineering 427.
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Chemistry 599       Selected Topics in Chemistry
Selected topics are offered based on the interests of Chemistry faculty and students.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Prerequisite(s):
Consent of the Department.
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Graduate Courses

Advanced graduate level courses are listed below. Courses in certain areas are grouped under "Selected Topics" titles. The content and offering of these are decided annually by the Department to meet the requirements of graduate students in the program. A student may receive credit for several courses in a given selected topics area. Details of offerings and course outlines may be obtained from the Department on request.

Unless stated otherwise the prerequisite for entry to all courses at the 600 level and above is "consent of the Department." Only where appropriate to a student's program may graduate credit be received for courses numbered 500-599.

Chemistry 601       Research Seminar
Reports on studies of the literature or of current research. Required of all graduate students in Chemistry.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(2S-0)
NOT INCLUDED IN GPA
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Chemistry 603       Research Seminar
Continuation of Chemistry 601.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(2S-0)
NOT INCLUDED IN GPA
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Chemistry 613       Electrochemical Fundamentals and Methodologies
Origin, significance, and thermodynamics of interfacial potential differences; structure of the double layer; basic principles of electron transfer at interfaces, Butler-Volmer equation; mass transport control of electro-chemical reactions; controlled potential methods as applied to electrode surface reactions and homogeneous reactions coupled to electron-transfer processes.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 615       Analytical Separations
Theory and practice of resolving mixtures into separate components for analysis. Basic theory; liquid-liquid extraction; high performance liquid chromatography; gas-liquid, open bed, ion exchange and exclusion chromatography; electrophoresis.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 617       Advanced Analytical Chemistry
Consideration of principles and equilibria pertaining to aqueous and nonaqueous neutralization, redox, complexation, precipitation and potentiometric methods employed in analyses. Statistical considerations of analytical data and analysis.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 619       Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry
Topics of current interest such as: properties of synthetic polymer membranes, advanced instrumental methods, developments in chemical sensors, speciation studies, environmental analytical chemistry.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Chemistry 621       Organometallic Chemistry
A detailed discussion of structure, bonding and preparative methods in organometallic chemistry including the industrial and synthetic applications of organometallic compounds.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 623       Chemistry of the Main Group Elements
The chemistry of electron-deficient, electron-precise, and electron-rich rings, inorganic polymers, and organometallic compounds of the main group elements; applications of spectroscopic techniques; industrial uses. Seminars on recent research developments.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 627       Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry
Aspects of theoretical inorganic and organometallic chemistry including: quantitative and qualitative molecular orbital theory; the bonding and structure of molecules, clusters, and extended arrays; the fragments of organometallic species; orbital correlation diagrams in inorganic reactions; spectroscopic methods and their interpretation.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 629       Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry
Courses are offered to cover topics of current interest, such as bioinorganic chemistry, inorganic solution phenomena, and the inorganic chemistry of the solid state.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Chemistry 641       Concepts in Biochemical Toxicology
An interdisciplinary course focused on the diverse biomolecular mechanisms by which organic (e.g. PCB’s) and inorganic pollutants (e.g. Cd, Hg, As) adversely affect cell function examined at multiple levels of organization, from molecules to whole organisms. Topics include how natural toxins exert toxicity, how toxins/light generate free radicals within cells, how the speciation of metals in the environment affects their bioavailability/toxicity, and the toxicity mechanisms that lead to homeostatic dysfunction.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
Antirequisite(s):
Credit for Chemistry 641 and either Chemistry 541 or Biochemistry 541 will not be allowed.
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Chemistry 651       Advanced Organic Stereochemistry
Stereochemical principles in organic chemistry, including: geometry, bonding, symmetry, molecular isomerism, conformational analysis, asymmetric and stereocontrolled reactions.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 653       Advanced Organic Spectroscopy

Advanced spectroscopic techniques for the determination of complex organic structures. Emphasis will be on NMR methods, practical aspects of acquiring spectra, advanced interpretation and reporting spectral data.


Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 655       Advanced Organic Synthesis
A review of modern synthetic reactions and methods in the field of organic chemistry with emphasis on the recent literature.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 657       Theoretical Organic Chemistry
Theoretical principles of organic chemistry including stereochemistry, molecular orbital calculations, pericyclic processes (Woodward-Hoffmann rules), and PMO theory.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 659       Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry
Courses are offered in major branches of organic chemistry, including: carbohydrate chemistry, steroids and terpenoids, semiochemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as other topics of current interest.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Chemistry 669       Selected Topics in Applied Chemistry
Courses are offered in such topics as electrochemistry, industrial catalysis, chemistry of energy sources, colloid and surface chemistry and polymer chemistry.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Chemistry 681       Crystallography
A general introduction to X-ray analysis of single crystals. Topics include: Geometry of the crystalline state; diffraction of X-rays; Fourier synthesis; methods of structure solution; accuracy and precision of derived parameters.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
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Chemistry 689       Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry
Courses are offered in such topics as dielectric properties, kinetics, molecular vibrations, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction.
Course Hours:
3 units; H(3-0)
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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Chemistry 701       Independent Study
Independent study not directly related to the student's thesis project normally under the direction of any chemistry faculty member. A course information sheet must be provided and a student report must be submitted on completion of the course.
Course Hours:
3 units; H
Notes:
Multiple 701 courses can be offered in any one term. However, students may take this course for credit not more than twice.
MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT
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