University of Calgary

Top three

UToday HomeMay 8, 2012

By Jennifer Sowa

Saeed Daneshmand, second from left, receives the third-place award from officials with the National Security Innovation Competition and the National Homeland Defense Foundation. Photo courtesy National Homeland Defense FoundationSaeed Daneshmand, second from left, receives the third-place award from officials with the National Security Innovation Competition and the National Homeland Defense Foundation. Photo courtesy National Homeland Defense FoundationAn anti-electronic interference algorithm developed by two PhD candidates at the Schulich School of Engineering has received international attention at a competition focused on national security issues. Saeed Daneshmand and Ali Jafarnia-Jahromi placed third out of ten finalists in the 2012 National Security Innovation Competition at the University of Colorado on April 27.

Their project entitled GPS Anti-Interference: A Practical Array Processing Approach describes a sophisticated technique to thwart interference attacks on GPS signals that can lead to incorrect navigational data and misdirect aircraft or cars, for example.

It was the only entry from outside the United States in the sixth-annual competition organized by the National Homeland Defense Foundation. Every year, North American undergraduate and graduate students are invited to present a new concept or technology that addresses a national security issue. It was a highly competitive process the saw 10 finalists selected from nearly 40 submissions. The finalists were invited to orally present their submissions at a workshop in Colorado Springs on April 27.

Scholarship grants are awarded to the top three winners. Daneshmand and Jafarnia-Jahromi received $2,500 while the first-place team from North Eastern University in Boston received $10,000 and the second-place team from the United States Military Academy West Point near New York City took home $5,000.

The faculty supervisor of Daneshmand and Jafarnia-Jahromi is Professor Gérard Lachapelle and their advisor is Dr. Ali Broumandan, post-doctoral fellow, of the Positioning, Location, and Navigation (PLAN) Group in the Department of Geomatics Engineering.