University of Calgary

Olympic Oval gets a waste free makeover

UToday HomeJune 28, 2011

By Anna Nowaczyk

Project manager Ashwani (Ash) Gupta is overseeing the Olympic Oval reroofing, ensuring all waste is diverted from landfill. Photo by Elizabeth BrennanProject manager Ashwani (Ash) Gupta is overseeing the Olympic Oval reroofing, ensuring all waste is diverted from landfill. Photo by Elizabeth BrennanOne of Calgary’s most iconic buildings, the Olympic Oval, is getting a facelift this summer but no waste from the project will go to landfill; a direction most university construction and demolition projects are taking in an effort to achieve a net zero waste campus.

The 12,000 panels on the roof are being removed and cleaned up –the rust will be removed and they’ll get a new coat of primer and enamel–which will upgrade waterproofing, drainage and thermal components of the roof.

“Each panel on the roof is a unique shape, so it must go back in the same place. The roofing contractor, Skyline, had to come up with a logistics plan and numbering system to do this,” says Ashwani (Ash) Gupta, project manager, facilities development.

Existing base layers are being preserved including the first membrane layer, metal decking and galvanized metal lining. Additional membrane layers will be installed and a recyclable “Cavityrock” insulation will be used so that future restoration projects on the oval’s roof can also be waste free.

Throughout the demolition process, various wastes will go for reuse or recycling. About 800,000 board feet of Expanded Polystyrene insulation is being sent to PlastiFab for creation of other plastic products, and Calgary Metal is recycling 230,000 lbs of flashings, galvanized steel, and other metal scraps.

“It is possible to recycle most materials these days, and manufacturers are excited to recycle materials as well,” says Gupta. “Everyone has a responsibility to reduce waste and use products made out of recycled materials. The University of Calgary is working hard on these sustainability goals.”

Currently, 68 percent of construction and demolition waste from projects is being diverted from landfill but U of C aims to bring that up to 80 percent by 2020.

The retrofit will maintain the original appearance and design intent of the Oval’s roof.

 

For more stories on how students, staff and faculty are stepping up together to turn SustainabilityON or to learn how you can become involved, visit: www.ucalgary.ca/sustainability/