University of Calgary

CRC renewed for economics professor

UToday HomeApril 25, 2012

Scott Taylor is investigating the role energy and energy policy may play in affecting economic growth and climate change. Photo courtesy Scott Taylor Scott Taylor is investigating the role energy and energy policy may play in affecting economic growth and climate change. Photo courtesy Scott Taylor Economics professor Scott Taylor has had his Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in International, Energy, and Environmental Economics renewed with $1.4 million in funding over the next seven years, one of 132 CRCs at 36 Canadian post-secondary institutions.

Taylor is investigating the role energy and energy policy may play in affecting economic growth and climate change. A wholesale shift to renewable green energy is often advocated as means to prevent catastrophic climate change; however for Canada and for almost all of countries in the developed world, this shift would require extensive changes to current energy systems. While in theory such a shift may seem easy, very little is known about how energy transitions were accomplished in the past. Understanding past transitions, their speed, scope, and magnitude, is key to understanding the likelihood of accelerating any future transition.

Taylor is one of the most highly cited environmental economists in the world with a track record of eclectic scholarly contributions on a wide range of topics from the study of intellectual property rights and economic growth, to species extinction and civilization collapse.

His most influential work examines how the level of pollution concentrations in major cities is affected by changes in industrial production brought about by international trade. Other important work links the health of biological resources such as fish and forest stocks to the pressures brought about by globalization. In recognition of this work, in 2010 he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Basel Switzerland for his pioneering work on trade, the environment and renewable resources.