The Power of Exercise: Fitness from the Inside Out

There’s more to working out than looking good. Discover the many ways exercise and nutrition contribute to a healthy body, brain and overall well-being.

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Fitness affects more than what meets the eye. Sure, staying in tip-top shape helps us look good, but did you know leading a healthy, active lifestyle offers a host of benefits, ranging from disease prevention to building mental strength and a strong community? Come learn from leading experts the many ways exercise and nutrition contribute to a healthier you from the inside out.

Speakers

Jodi Nettleton

Jodi Nettleton, BSc’13

Jodi Nettleton, BSc’13 and PhD candidate in the Faculty of Kinesiology at UCalgary, works under the supervision of Raylene Reimer in the area of nutrition, metabolism and genetics. Her research focuses on the impact of dietary ingredients on gut microbiota profiles, with a special focus on how changes in microbiota composition during pregnancy and in early life contribute to long-lasting changes in metabolism and behaviour. Jodi completed a Bachelor of Science with honours in exercise and health physiology at UCalgary in 2013, and is funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute. 

Meghan McDonough

Meghan McDonough

Meghan McDonough is an assistant professor with UCalgary’s Faculty of Kinesiology in the area of exercise, health and sport psychology. Her work examines the role of social relationships in physical activity motivation and behaviour, and how the relationships we form in physical activity contexts contribute to psychological well-being, coping with stress and self-perceptions. Her research examines these questions across a variety of populations, particularly older adults, cancer survivors, people with Parkinson’s disease and youth living in poverty. Meghan is an associate editor for the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, and is a recipient of the Franklin Henry Young Scientist Award from the Canadian Society of Psychomotor Learning and Sport Psychology.