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Nursing postdoc crosses an ocean to begin Eyes High studies

Research looks at effects of CUPS programs on children’s brain development
February 18, 2014
Mubashir Arain describes his postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary as “a precious post” to further his health services research skills and assist with the CUPS project. He’s pictured with Karen Benzies, professor in the Faculty of Nursing. Photo by Riley Brandt

Mubashir Arain describes his postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary as “a precious post” to further his health services research skills and assist with the CUPS project. He’s pictured with Karen Benzies, professor in the Faculty of Nursing. Photo by Riley Brandt 

When Mubashir Arain was planning his next step following completion of his doctorate in health services research at the University of Sheffield, England, moving his family almost 7,000 kilometres was an exciting challenge.   

"The opportunity to work as an Eyes High postdoctoral fellow I regard as a precious post," says the newly-arrived Arain, the only Faculty of Nursing postdoc under the Eyes High initiative. "And the potential to work with Dr. Karen Benzies on her CUPS (Calgary Urban Project Society) project was very exciting; those are the main the reasons why I decided to move here during winter!"

Arain will assist Benzies on an evaluation project, funded by the Max Bell Foundation, to analyze the effect of CUPS' parenting education and family support programs on the brain development of the children and the overall well-being of the family.

"I am so delighted to have someone of Dr. Arain's caliber, with his advanced skills and research perspective, join the team," Benzies says. "In addition to contributing to our research program, he will be helping CUPS improve their database and produce high quality reports with in-depth analysis."

Previous to completing his PhD on GP-led walk-in clinics in the UK, a relatively new phenomenon, Arain did a master's degree in public health in 2009. He worked for Oxford University for three years as a consumer research co-ordinator in the area of cancer research and has published a number of research papers in international medical journals.

Arain hopes to become more settled after he and his wife Nasira and 18-month-old son Umar move into their permanent residence at the beginning of March. "When I arrived in Calgary, it was very cold, but the welcome was very warm.  I am looking forward to my time at the University of Calgary to further refine my health services research skills."