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Double-Blind Review at Journals

Submitted by Richard Zach on Mon, 04/14/2008 - 3:09am

Linear Logic is Pseudoscience?

Submitted by Richard Zach on Sun, 04/13/2008 - 7:45pm

There's a very laudable enterprise: Blogging on Pseudoscience (at BPSDB.org) aggregates blog posts debunking or pointing out pseudo-scientific nonsense such as Intelligent Design. Lots of good stuff, PZ Meyers is part of it, etc. But, look at the logo they use:

BPSDB

Gupta on Definitions

Submitted by Richard Zach on Fri, 04/11/2008 - 2:10am

Kurt Gödel Centenary Research Fellowship Winners

Submitted by Richard Zach on Thu, 04/03/2008 - 4:56pm

Awareness Test

Submitted by Richard Zach on Thu, 04/03/2008 - 4:53pm

Hi, I promise to post something logic-related very soon. In the meantime, please enjoy this funny video:
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahg6qcgoay4&hl=en]
Please look in the mirror before you open your car door!

Philosophy of Logic Books?

Submitted by Richard Zach on Tue, 02/26/2008 - 9:24am

Shawn at Words and Other Things asks about good books on philosophy of logic. If you have suggestions, comment there, please.

Play the Hydra Game online!

Submitted by Richard Zach on Sat, 02/02/2008 - 5:19pm

Nice! Andrej Bauer has implemented the Hydra Game in a Java applet. The Hydra Game, like Goodstein sequences, is a way of coding ordinals ? ?0 ... hence they provide independence results from Peano Arithmetic. Andrej has all the deets. (A Java applet for Goodstein sequences is here.)

John Burgess, Philosophical Logic

Submitted by Richard Zach on Mon, 01/28/2008 - 9:05am

John Burgess has a draft of a book on Philosophical Logic up on his website. It focusses on logics with direct philosophical relevance. It starts with temporal and modal logic, deals with conditional logics, "relevantistic" logics, and intuitionistic logic. It will be a relatively slim volume, but there's still a lot of interest in here: a nice little book.

Checklist for submitting a manuscript

Submitted by Richard Zach on Wed, 01/23/2008 - 8:10am

Mike Kaspari of Getting things done in academia has a useful checklist of things to do before you send off a paper. It talks about "data", "results", and "controls", but it mostly applies to logic or philosophy as well. Mike asks for input on what else one should do.
(HT: Semantics etc.)

More Introductions to Forcing

Submitted by Richard Zach on Tue, 12/18/2007 - 11:18am

Tim Chow has posted a new version of his "Beginner's guide to forcing" (previously announced here) on arXiv, and points to other introductions to forcing: one by Kenny Easwaran, who's also posted his "Cheerful introduction to forcing and the con

Reduction and Elimination in Philosophy and the Sciences

Submitted by Richard Zach on Tue, 12/11/2007 - 5:04pm
CALL FOR PAPERS

31st International Wittgenstein Symposium 2008 on

Reduction and Elimination in Philosophy and the Sciences

Kirchberg am Wechsel, Austria, 10-16 August 2008
http://www.alws.at/

INVITED SPEAKERS

On the Campaign Trail

Submitted by Richard Zach on Wed, 12/05/2007 - 9:50pm

The ASL Newsletter came in the mail today, so if you're a member, you should be getting yours about now as well. For the first time in a long while, the election to the ASL council is contested. I'm not going to ask you to vote for me, but you should vote!

A Beginner's Guide to Forcing

Submitted by Richard Zach on Wed, 12/05/2007 - 6:41pm

From Tim Chow via FOM:

I have just completed a first draft of an expository paper on forcing.

http://alum.mit.edu/www/tchow/forcing.pdf

This paper grew out of a sci.math.research article that I posted back in 2001 entitled "Forcing for dummies":

http://groups.google.com/group/sci.math.research/msg/c2d65d1a23eabb66

Sabbatical in one week!

Submitted by Richard Zach on Mon, 12/03/2007 - 4:58pm

I'm on sabbatical next term, and am off to Europe in one week--and it looks like that's not a day too soon. Teaching modal logic and history of analytic this term was a lot of fun, but I look forward to getting writing done.

Ted Sider: Logic for Philosophy

Submitted by Richard Zach on Wed, 11/28/2007 - 5:52pm

A year and a half ago, Andy Arana and I organized a session at the Pacific APA about logic and philosophy graduate education. One of the panelists was Ted Sider, who spoke about what kinds of logic he thought a philosophy grad student should know. He's been teaching a course on exactly that, i.e., a "logic literacy" course for philosophers. His notes for that course have morphed into a book draft, and the book will eventually come out with OUP.

Archimedes on Infinity

Submitted by Richard Zach on Mon, 11/19/2007 - 6:26pm

Henry E. Kyburg, Jr., 1928-2007

Submitted by Richard Zach on Fri, 11/16/2007 - 6:21pm

Henry Kyburg, Professor of Philosophy and Computer Science at the University of Rochester and an eminent logician and formal epistemologist, passed away on October 30.

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