University of Calgary

Faculty of Nursing exports its expertise to India for much-needed stroke project

UToday HomeMarch 4, 2013

Doctors Kathryn King-Shier and Teri Green with staff of Apollo Gleneagles Hospital in Kolkata, India. To the right of Green are Dr. Jayanta Roy and cardiologist Survo Banerjee.Doctors Kathryn King-Shier and Teri Green with staff of Apollo Gleneagles Hospital in Kolkata, India. To the right of Green are Dr. Jayanta Roy and cardiologist Survo Banerjee.The Faculty of Nursing’s Teri Green is quickly becoming a “stroke guru,” counseling health-care practitioners around the world on best practices on the trajectory of strokes.

Most recently, Green — together with collaborator, cardiovascular nurse scientist and Faculty of Nursing colleague Kathryn King-Shier — journeyed to India to teach nurses at Apollo Gleneagles Hospital in Kolkata and G. B. Pant Hospital in New Delhi.

“I was invited by Dr. Jayanta Roy,” says Green, an associate professor and stroke researcher, “who I met while he was completing a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in the Calgary Stroke Program, Department of Clinical Neurosciences in the Faculty of Medicine.”

In 2005, Roy returned to Kolkata where he has recently opened the first-ever acute stroke management program for that city.

“Dr. Roy wants to continue to develop his stroke program at Apollo Hospital where he is now a senior consultant, managing a very comprehensive stroke unit,” Green continues. “In India, stroke victims are treated, receive some rehabilitation and then are sent home.

“Nurses need to be educated on what happens during and after a stroke in order to teach patients and families about what to expect once they return to the community. This includes providing the nurses with the skills to help these stroke survivors through transitions across the acute stroke period and on to rehabilitation and reintegration.

“A big challenge in India is keeping qualified nurses,” she adds. “So a key element of the program there is adequate orientation and ongoing education to hopefully reduce some of the turnover. We began planning this education workshop almost two years ago as Dr. Roy was very keen to have the nursing expertise built in the Calgary Stroke Program shared with the nurses in the program he was getting underway in India.”

In addition to providing instructional presentations to clinical nursing staff, doctors Green and King-Shier trained research staff to initiate further studies in both Kolkata and New Delhi. They will travel to China in March to continue their research projects, started last year (see UToday, May 17, 2012), on multi-ethnic patients: King-Shier’s project examines sex differences in the presentation of acute coronary syndrome and access to care while Green will further her study on patients with acute stroke.

 

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