University of Calgary

Grad student scores rare Canadian invite to Nobel Laureate event

UToday HomeMarch 13, 2013

Grad student Lauren Doyle is researching the fundamental chemistry of water splitting as a clean way of producing hydrogen for fuel. Photo by Warren PiersGrad student Lauren Doyle is researching the fundamental chemistry of water splitting as a clean way of producing hydrogen for fuel. Photo by Warren PiersUniversity of Calgary grad student Lauren Doyle is one of five chemistry students across Canada to be invited to attend the 63rd annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting June 30 to July 5.

The prestigious annual meeting, on the shores of Germany’s Lake Constance, brings together 35 Nobel Laureates in chemistry along with 625 chemistry students from 78 countries, selected through a rigorous, multi-stage process as part of the “the next generation of leading scientists and researchers.”

The week-long meeting will include lectures, discussion sessions, master classes and panel discussions on green chemistry, biochemical processes and structures and other topics.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for me,” says Doyle, who developed a passion for chemistry as an undergraduate at Dalhousie University. She came to Calgary in the summer of 2012 to join the Piers research group in the Department of Chemistry in the Faculty of Science.

The Piers group aims to develop and understand important catalytic transformations in order to help meet our energy needs in the future. This includes studying what kind of catalysts will harness the power of the sun to effect water splitting on the scale necessary to help fuel our future.

Doyle studies organometallic approaches to water activation. "In my research, I look at developing the fundamental chemistry of the water splitting process as it is a clean way of producing hydrogen which can be used as a fuel," says Doyle. Society needs a fundamental understanding of the processes involved in deriving energy from more benign sources, she says.

“I very much look forward to meeting students from other countries and being exposed to ideas from world leaders in the field of chemistry,” says Doyle. “I’m especially excited at the prospect of meeting 2005 Nobel laureates Robert Grubbs and Richard Schrock for their work on metal-catalyzed olefin metathesis.”

When she is not meeting with Nobel Laureates, she is also hoping to get in a little traveling around Europe.

For more information on the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, visit: www.lindau-nobel.org

To learn more about the research by the Piers Group in the Department of Chemistry, visit: www.ucalgary.ca/wpiers

 

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