University of Calgary

University law blog wins award

UToday HomeJanuary 9, 2013

By Sarah McGinnis

ABlawg.ca, the Faculty of Law’s blog exploring legal issues and decisions affecting Albertans, has been named the best law school blog for 2012.ABlawg.ca, the Faculty of Law’s blog exploring legal issues and decisions affecting Albertans, has been named the best law school blog for 2012.The Canadian Law Blog Awards, also known as Clawbies, are announced each year on New Year’s Eve. With more than 400 Canadian law blogs online to choose from, the University of Calgary Faculty of Law’s own ABlawg was named the Best Law School Blog for 2012.

“This is always one of our toughest calls, since the quality of Canadian legal academic blogs is uniformly high. This year, however, our choice was made easier by the outstanding performance by ABlawg, the University of Calgary Faculty of Law Blog,” Clawbie organizers explained.

“Relevant and well-read beyond the walls of academia, the ABlawg is frequently consulted by practitioners throughout the province of Alberta, and it’s the rare law school periodical of any type that can lay claim to that accomplishment.”

ABlawg was the brainchild of law professor Jonnette Watson Hamilton, and was started up by associate law professor Jennifer Koshan in fall 2007, going live in February 2008. ABlawg is currently coordinated and edited by Arlene Kwasniak, professor, associate dean, research and graduate program director for the Faculty of Law.

“ABlawg is a wonderful example of a collaborative research effort within the Faculty of Law. Our blog allows us to engage with the community by getting our research on law and policy out to our readers quickly, accessibly, and interactively,” said Koshan.

“We know that our posts are being read by judges, lawyers, law and policy makers, students, academics, and others interested in law and policy developments, and we believe we are making an important contribution to the dialogue,” she said.

The blog includes commentary by faculty members, sessional instructors, research associates, practitioners, and students. It features insights on court and tribunal decisions as well as legislative and policy developments in, or relevant to Alberta. Subjects are as varied as the decisions and developments. These include social justice legal issues, legal ethics, environmental, natural resources, and energy law, bankruptcy and insolvency, common law, and administrative law. The media are among its growing readership.

“ABlawg is indebted to many for this accomplishment and honor, including its long-time supporters, excellent contributors, engaged readers, enthusiastic commentators, tireless editorial staff and volunteers, and, of course, those who showed their appreciation and support by nominating ABlawg for an award,” said Kwasniak.

For more information about the Clawbies, including other award winners: www.clawbies.ca.

ABlawg can be found at www.ablawg.ca.