University of Calgary

Peace Offerings

UToday HomeDecember 6, 2012

Saima Jamal (centre), program manager of the Consortium for Peace Studies, receives the Alberta Civil Liberties Award from Linda MacKay (left) and Brian Seaman (right) from the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre. Photo by Sabeel KhanSaima Jamal (centre), program manager of the Consortium for Peace Studies, receives the Alberta Civil Liberties Award from Linda MacKay (left) and Brian Seaman (right) from the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre. Photo by Sabeel KhanThe University of Calgary’s Consortium for Peace Studies has been having a busy season celebrating its people and their work.

On Nov. 29, Saima Jamal, the consortium’s program manager, won the 2012 Alberta Civil Liberties Award for her outstanding contributions to raising awareness about human rights and civil liberty issues in Alberta. The award stems from public education awareness work Jamal has undertaken through the consortium which exposed Albertans to the infringement of people’s rights and civil liberties in different political and environmental conflicts around the world.

“Civil liberties and human rights activists rarely get celebrated,” says Jamal. “I would like to recognize the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre for thinking outside the box to realize that work in the field of human rights goes hand-in-hand with peace education. This is a first for me and I am extremely honoured.”

The consortium has even more to celebrate this season. Yvonne Hébert, a long-time member and supporter of the consortium and a professor in the Faculty of Education, recently received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for her exceptional service to the Francophone community. Hébert accepted the award from Senator Claudette Tardif on Oct. 13 in Edmonton. This service includes research and community development which led to the establishment of Francophone education in Calgary and, more recently, research on immigration.

Yvonne Hébert (right), long-time support of the Consortium for Peace Studies, receives the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal from Senator Claudette Tardif. Photo by Sébastien Guillier-SahuquéYvonne Hébert (right), long-time support of the Consortium for Peace Studies, receives the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal from Senator Claudette Tardif. Photo by Sébastien Guillier-Sahuqué“Throughout my career at the University of Calgary, I have been actively involved in this dossier as teacher, researcher and community activist,” says Hébert. “I’ve always supported linguistic rights, peace studies, community development, and the importance of institutional completeness to assure the vitality of Francophone communities whose presence contributes to making this a great country.”

The university community is invited to celebrate the success of the Consortium for Peace Studies at their year-end Christmas Social on Dec. 14 from 6-7:30 p.m. in the Joyce and Quenten Doolittle Studio, Cragie Hall Block F.

This event is free and open to the public by RSVP, and will feature food, drinks and a staged reading by winning playwright Jordan Tannahill — who won the Consortium’s Uprising Playwriting Competition on Peace, Politics and Society. His play, Late Company, is both a timely and timeless meditation on a parent’s struggle with the consequences of their child’s bullying.

Learn more about the consortium’s work.