University of Calgary

Royal recognition

UToday HomeDecember 17, 2012

By Betty Rice

Professor Yvonne Hebert proudly wears her Jubilee Medal, awarded for her work with the francophone community in Alberta. Photo by Betty RiceProfessor Yvonne Hebert proudly wears her Jubilee Medal, awarded for her work with the francophone community in Alberta. Photo by Betty Rice

Each year, senior Government of Canada officials are given the privilege of presenting medals to outstanding Canadians on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II. Recipients of the medals include long-time volunteers, community leaders or other prominent personalities.

This year, to mark the 60th anniversary of the queen’s accession to the throne, a special commemorative medal was created and named the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Yvonne Hebert, professor emeritus in the Faculty of Education, proudly sports one on her lapel. The Diamond Jubilee award was presented to Hebert by Alberta Senator Claudette Tardif at a special ceremony in Edmonton on October 13. In a letter from Senator Tardif, Hebert was recognized “for her outstanding contribution to Calgary’s francophone community in many areas.”

During the ceremony, Senator Tardif remarked: “It is my great honour and privilege to recognize these individuals for their outstanding and ongoing dedication to the development and vitality of Alberta’s francophone communities. Strong and vibrant communities grow through the sustained efforts of those committed to the vitality of the francophone community in Alberta.”

Hebert was joined by 19 other Albertans from the Franco-Alberta community. The Association Canadienne-française de l’Alberta’s (ACFA) formed a nomination committee to assist the senator in selecting the recipients. The medal recipients came from across Alberta, and have distinguished themselves by their exemplary contributions in education, arts and culture, immigration, and community service. The awards took place as part of the ACFA’s annual Gala de Reconnaissance (recognition).

Hebert also received the Roger Motut award in 2010 for her writings, which was awarded to her by the provincial francophone association.

“This medal builds upon that previous award and reflects very positively upon the Faculty of Education,” says Hebert. “It is not possible to contribute to community life via research, writings, and publications, without a congenial, supportive academic community.”