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Biographies

ISPIA Director

Dr. Rei Safavi-Naini
AITF Strategic Chair in Information Security and Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Rei Safavi-Naini's  research interests are cryptography, information theoretic security, security protocols and systems, and data privacy. Her research is driven by, (i) security questions that arise by advances in computer and communication technologies and their applications in everyday life, and (ii) fundamental information theoretic questions and limits of providing security  in different scenarios. Her recent research directions are, cloud security, communications security, user authentication, and data sanitization and protection.

ISPIA Board Members

Dr. Ken Barker
Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Ken Barker holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science from the University of Alberta (1990) and has more than two decades of experience working with industrial computer systems and has consulting experience in the design of commercial databases. He has particular interest in system integration, distributed systems, and the privacy and security of data repositories. His research interests have included mobile data systems, object-oriented database systems, bioinformatics and heterogeneous systems. He has served as the Dean of the Faculty of Science and as the Department Head of Computer Science at the University of Calgary.  He is the Past President of the Canadian Association of Computer Science (CACS/AIC) and has served on the Computer Science Accreditation Council. Dr. Barker has published over 200 peer reviewed publications in areas as diverse as distributed systems, software engineering, transaction systems, simulations, spatial database systems, social networks, geographical information systems, astro-informatics, privacy and security.

Dr. Phillip Fong
Canada Research Chair in Software Security (Tier II) and Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Philip Fong received his Ph.D. from the Simon Fraser University in 2004. His research interests include protection technologies for social computing, access control, and language-based security.

Dr. Greg Hagen
Associate Professor, Faculty of Law; Associate Dean - Research; Director of Graduate Programs, Univeristy of Calgary

Greg Hagen's research interests are in technology and IP law, information security and privacy law, legal theory and science policy. His research seeks to understand the relationships between law, science and technology. His research includes the regulation of synthetic biology, biosecurity, Internet regulation, the regulation of surveillance technology and the use of information technology in courts, administrative bodies and registries.

Dr. Michael J. Jacobson, Jr.
Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Michael Jacobson is a professor in the Computer Science department at the University of Calgary.  His main research interests are computational number theory and applications to public-key cryptography. In addition to fundamental questions in computational number theory, his research deals with cryptographic protocols based on certain number theoretic structures, aiming to improve their efficiency and better understand their security. By working towards more efficient algorithms for arithmetic in class groups of number fields and algebraic curves, we achieve faster cryptosystems.  By studying problems such as the discrete logarithm problem in these settings through algorithm development and benchmarking, we achieve a better understanding of the security of these systems in practice.

Dr. Renate Scheidler
Professor; Graduate Program Director, Department of Mathematics & Statistics and Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Renate Scheidler is a Professor with a dual appointment in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. Her research interests are in algorithmic number theory and public key cryptography. Professor Scheidler’s work explores computationally hard problems in mathematical structures such as global fields and curves. It is motivated not only by the desire to better understand the behavior of these structures, but also to explore their suitability for cryptographic applications. Professor Scheidler’s work focuses on the design, analysis and implementation of algorithms in global fields and algebraic curves. This includes efficient state-of-the-art arithmetic as well as methods for computing number theoretic invariants of these objects. Since invariants are generally very difficult to compute, one of her main research thrusts is to better understand and assess the inherent difficulties of these computational problems, with the intent to utilize them as the basis for the security of public key cryptographic primitives.

ISPIA Faculty Members

Dr. John Aycock
CMD Program Director and Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

John Aycock received his Ph.D. from the University of Victoria in 2001. He teaches about malicious software and its defenses, and has research interests in compilers and system software as they relate to malicious software countermeasures.

Dr. Mark Bauer
Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Calgary

Mark Bauer's research interests are in algorithmic number theory, public key cryptography and Diophantine approximation. Professor Bauer’s work explores computationally hard problems in mathematical structures such as function fields and improving the efficiency of algorithms used in this setting. It is motivated not only by the desire to better understand the behavior of these structures, but also to explore their suitability for cryptographic applications. Professor Bauer’s work focuses on the design, analysis and implementation of algorithms in function fields of algebraic curves. This includes efficient state-of-the-art arithmetic as well as methods for computing number theoretic invariants of these objects.  Furthermore, his research focuses on the study of more complex objects that can serve as suitable alternatives for popular cryptographic primitives.

Dr. Tanya Beran
Associate Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences and Medical Education Research Unit , University of Calgary

Dr. Beran has published many studies on child heath, evaluation, assessment, and measurement. Specific recent projects include research in teaching evaluation; clinical practice analysis; physician feedback; neonatal simulation; identity development and study strategies in clerkship; and workforce and psychological characteristics of international medical graduates.

Dr. Gavin Cameron
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Calgary

Dr. Cameron received his PhD in 1998 from the University of St Andrews. He is an Associate Director of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary and a member of the Executive Board of the Canadian Association for Security & Intelligence Studies (CASIS). His research centres on the threat of, and responses to, terrorism.

Dr. Jörg Denzinger
Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Jörg Denzinger's general research interests are in the areas of Artificial Intelligence and Multi-Agent Systems. His recent work relevant to Information Security is investigating the use of techniques for learning (cooperative) behaviour to find possible interactions with a system that lead to unwanted behavior of the targeted system. Such unwanted behavior can crash the system, produce inconsistencies in it, or get information out of it that should not be given out. Naturally, the idea is to use these techniques together with system developers to identify problems before systems are released.

Dr. Maureen Duffy
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Calgary

Dr. Duffy's teaching and research interests include constitutional law, national security law, criminal procedure, international criminal law, international human rights law, children's law, and media and internet law.

Dr. Vassil Dimitrov
Associate Professor, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Calgary

Dr. Vassil Dimitrov's main research interests include efficient algorithms and architectures for digital signal processing, information security and image compression applications. He is particularly interested in applying methods from number theory and algebraic geometry aimed at speeding up the performance of very complex real-time digital signal processing and information security systems.

Dr. Edna Einsiedel
Professor, Communication and Culture, University of Calgary

My interests are around the study of science, technology and society. My work proceeds from the premise that technology is not merely an artifact, a product of a unique technical rationality. Rather, technology evolves from both technical and social factors.

Dr. Patrick Feng
Assistant Professor, Communication and Culture, University of Calgary

Dr. Marina Gavrilova
Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Marina L. Gavrilova received her MSc from Lomonosov Moscow State University and her Ph.D from the University of Calgary. Her research interests include biometric security, computational geometry, image processing, optimization, and computer modeling. Professor Gavrilova is a founder of two research labs: the Biometric Technologies Laboratory and the SPARCS Laboratory for Spatial Analysis in Computational Sciences. Her publication list includes over ten books and book chapters and 80 research papers. Professor Gavrilova is an Editor-in-Chief for Transactions on Computational Science Journal, Springer-Verlag as well as serves on the Editorial Board for IJCSE Journal and Computer Graphics and CAD/CAM Journal.

Dr. Majid Ghaderi
Assistant Head (Prospective Graduate Students) and Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Majid Ghaderi received his Ph.D. from University of Waterloo in 2006. His research interests include wireless networking and mobile computing, with emphasis on analytical aspects of wireless systems. He is particularly interested in optimization, modeling and performance analysis of wireless networks.

Dr. Matthew Greenberg
Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary

Matthew Greenberg received his B.Sc. in 2000 from the University of Manitoba and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from McGill University in 2002 and 2006, respectively. His research interests include theoretical and computational aspects of algebraic number theory and arithmetic geometry, with a focus on applications of the theory of modular forms to the construction of rational points on elliptic curves.

Dr. Jim Haslett
Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary

Jim Haslett received his PhD from the University of Calgary in 1970. Since 1997, he has moved into the area of RFIC Design for wireless communications, and over the past 3 years has applied that knowledge to the design of ultra low noise CMOS amplifiers for radio telescopes, and to wireless patient vital sign monitoring at Foothills hospital in Calgary.

Dr. Peter Høyer
Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Peter Høyer's main research interests are in quantum computing and algorithmics. He has developed quantum algorithms, primitives, and protocols for both computational and cryptographic problems. He is broadly interested in theoretical computer science.

Dr. Thomas Keenan
Professor, Faculty of Environmental Design and and Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Tom Keenan has taught courses and seminars on computer security at The University of Calgary, The Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand) and at the former World Trade Center in New York. He chairs the International Summit on Cybercrime held annually in a major US city, and is one of the few civilian members of the Society for Policing in Cyberspace.

Dr. Henry Leung
Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Science, University of Calgary

Henry Leung's research interests are in the areas of automated systems, chaos, quantum system, computational intelligence, data fusion, data mining, nonlinear signal processing and cognitive modeling with applications to multi-sensor surveillance, decision support systems, remote sensing, multi-media, radar and wireless communications.

Dr. Zongpeng Li
Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary.

Zongpeng Li received his PhD from University of Toronto in 2005. His research interests are in computer networks, particularly in network optimization, multicast algorithm design, network game theory and network coding. Zongpeng was named an Edward S. Rogers Sr. Scholar in 2004, won the Alberta Ingenuity New Faculty Award in 2007, was nominated for the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in 2007, and received the Best Paper Award at PAM 2008 and at HotPOST 2012.

Dr. Richard Mollin
Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary

Richard Mollin has over 150 publications in numerous aspects of number theory, algebra and computation, including applications to cryptography. His current research on continued fraction expansions, Diophantine analysis and cryptographic applications is widely viewed as important and groundbreaking. He is considered a world expert on the theory of quadratics.

Dr. Barry Sanders
iCORE Chair of Quantum Information Science and Director, Institute for Quantum Science and Technology, University of Calgary

Barry Sanders received his PhD at Imperial College London in 1987. His main research interests are in quantum information science, quantum optics and photonic crystal-based designs of new-generation microwave antennae. Significant recent research achievements include identification of limitations on practical quantum cryptography, theory of optimal remote state preparation, no-go theorems on continuous variable quantum computation, and theory and experimental design for realistic threhold quantum secret sharing.

Dr. Wolfgang Tittel
iCORE Industrial Research Chair and Associate Profesor, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary

Wolfgang Tittel engaged in ground-breaking experiments in the field of quantum cryptography from the early stages on. The investigations were seminal in bringing quantum communication out of the laboratory and into the real world using a standard telecommunication fibre network, thereby raising both scientific and public awareness and appreciation that quantum technology is not restricted to contrived laboratory settings. His current interests include practical quantum cryptography, quantum relays and quantum memory.

Dr. Mea Wang
Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Mea Wang received her PhD at the University of Toronto in 2008. Dr. Wang’s research focuses on the design and development of networking systems and algorithms, and the research results span in different areas of computer networking, including multimedia networking, distributed systems, security, wireless networks, network coding, and cloud computing. In particular, her research team primarily resort to two research methodologies. One is analyzing practical network applications such as BitTorrent and Facebook. The other one is applying theoretical concepts such as network coding to practical applications such as multimedia streaming. Ultimately, her research goal is to improve the Quality of Service and performance of Internet services.

Dr. Svetlana Yanushkevich
Professor, and Acting Department Head, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary

Svetlana Yanushkevich's research areas include Biometric Technologies and Logic Design for Micro- and Nanoelectronics.