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RESPECT in the WORKPLACE PROGRAM

Submitted by cschasny on Fri, 01/24/2014 - 9:17am

The University of Calgary is committed to providing a workplace that respects and promotes human rights, personal dignity, and health and safety.

A respectful workplace is one that is healthy, safe, supportive and values diversity. It is a place where students and employees are valued; communication is polite and courteous; people are treated with respect; conflict is addressed in a positive and respectful manner; and disrespectful behavior, harassment, bullying, and discrimination are not tolerated.

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   What Respect means to me   

The University and all of its employees have a responsibility to create and maintain a respectful workplace. This includes:

  • fostering respectful behavior towards others;

  • avoiding placing one's self or others at risk;

  • respecting the value of diversity in the workplace;

  • challenging disrespectful or inappropriate behavior when it occurs;

  • reporting incidents of disrespectful behavior; and

  • utilizing the Employee and Family Assistance Program, if necessary

President Cannon is strongly committed to Respect in the Workplace. Listen to President Cannon's Message on how respectful conduct is a critical component of developing the healthy, energetic and productive campus community we need to achieve our Eyes High goal.

Submitted by 21232f297a57a5a... on Tue, 07/01/2014 - 6:19pm

As of February 15, 2016 over 56% of the full time employee group (faculty and staff) have participated in either the on-line training certification for Respect in the Workplace or attended a Respect in the Workplace workshop.

New employees are encouraged to participate in the Respect in the Workplace workshop offered as part of the Ubegin onboarding program.

Respect in the Workplace FAQs

Click on the sections below to get answers to some common questions regarding the University's Respect in the Workplace program.

Why is RESPECT fundamental to our success?

Respectful relationships and trust in our university, department, and project leaders are fundamental to achieving the healthy and positive workplace environment critical to achieving our goals.

As we know from the Hay Group research, respect is a key driver of engagement, collaboration, and effective team performance in the workplace. Benefits of a respectful workplace include improved team communication, improved morale and productivity, strengthened employee retention, reduced absenteeism, and enhanced organizational health.

While our 2015 engagement survey results show significant improvement over the 2011 & 2013 results, the University is still 9% below the North American average on the survey question "rate the university on treating you with respect as an individual." Over 30% of our workforce still feels they were not respected in one way or another over the past year.

Disrespect can take many forms:

Work Related

Person Related

Physical Related

  • Unrealistic workload
  • Withholding of information which affects your performance
  • Having your opinions ignored
  • Excessive monitoring of your work
  • Being humiliated or ridiculed in connection with your work
  • Spreading of gossip and rumors about you
  • Being ignored or excluded
  • Being ignored or facing a hostile reaction when you approach
  • Being the subject of excessive teasing and sarcasm
  • Being shouted at or the target of spontaneous anger
  • Finger pointing, invasion of personal space, shoving, blocking your way
  • Threats of violence or physical abuse or actual abuse

If you are experiencing or seeing any of these behaviours, speak up or seek support.

Creating a respectful workplace is up to each of us.

Together we can make the university a great place to work.

What is our RESPECT Program Model?

The Respect in the Workplace Program is a comprehensive program composed of the following three key components.

Respect Program Model

Setting Expectations

The University of Calgary is very clear on its philosophy on Respect in the Workplace, as stated in the introduction at the top of this webpage.

In addition, the University has several policies, procedures, and statements relating to Respect, including the Code of Conduct, the Harassment policy, the Workplace Violence policy, Non Academic Misconduct policy, and Procedures for Protected Disclosure. You can find links to these policies on the top right hand side of this webpage. 

Creating Awareness and Learning

On behalf of President Cannon, Human Resources is executing the University's Respect campaign to create awareness and learning. This campaign offers two key steps in our journey to move forward with a cultural change critical to achieving our Eyes High goals. These steps include a Respect in the Workplace online training program and a Respect Workshop.

The Respect in the Workplace online training program covers some important basic information about bullying, discrimination and harassment. It leads you through a series of vignettes to portray what a respectful workplace looks like. While it takes approximately 90 minutes to complete, it is composed of many short segments that you can start and stop at your leisure.

The Respect Workshop is focused on competencies and strategies to enhance your personal and leadership effectiveness, and our workplace culture. It is very interactive, practical and supportive.

Other plans related to awareness and learning include:

  • offering on-line toolkits: discussion guides and tips for individuals, leaders and teams
  • placing Culture of Respect/Respectful workplace items in the Wellness newsletter
  • integrating the Culture of Respect into HR programs (e.g. orientation, onboarding, performance management, leadership development)
  • offering sessions with external speakers and trainers (e.g. bullying, dealing with conflict)

The Office of Diversity, Equity and Protected Disclosure offers a number of workshops, some of which are noted below:

  • Anti-discrimination/racism Response Training (A.R.T.)
  • Bullying and Toxic Behaviours in the Workplace
  • Micro-Aggressions in the Workplace Unmasked
  • Sex, Power and Boundaries in the Ivory Tower
  • Bullies, Boors and Bigots
  • Homophobia & Transphobia
  • Promoting a Positive Sport Environment
  • The Uh-Oh Syndrome
  • What You Don't Know: The Science of Unconscious Bias

Supporting and Response

The University is working with the Faculty Association and AUPE to ensure that our faculty and staff are supported in the event of any complaints related to discrimination, harassment, bullying, or psychological safety.

HR is also committed to ensure all HR Partners are trained in the Investigation process to support our Management and Professional and other non-unionized staff. HR Services provides investigation and intervention services.

Talent Management provides coaching and team development intervention services to intact work teams and leaders as needed. Some external support may be required.

How do I register/enroll in the RESPECT Online Training Program

The University has invested in the Respect Group online training program, which has been customized for the University. The Respect Group is an organization founded by Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, in partnership with the Canadian Red Cross.

President Cannon has strongly endorsed this program. In her leader's message to introduce the on-line training, she outlines how respectful conduct is a critical component of developing the healthy, energetic, and productive campus community we need to achieve our Eyes High goal.

The online training addresses the topics of bullying, harassment, and discrimination and through many vignettes and role play, describes appropriate strategies to deal with those behaviours. The training takes approximately 90 minutes to complete. You can start and stop as desired so that it can be completed incrementally at your own pace. Upon completion of the program, you can print your certificate of completion.

This training serves as a foundational piece to develop common language and basic understanding across all faculty and staff at the University. All faculty and staff are asked to take this training. 

To register or access the online training program, click on this link:

https://universityofcalgaryworkplace.respectgroupinc.com

Collection Notice:
You will be prompted for your name, email address, employee ID and faculty/unit. This information is collected under the authority of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. It is required to register you in the Respect in the Workplace module. If you have any questions about the collection or use of this information, please contact hrcourse@ucalgary.ca

What are the RESPECT Workshops?

The Respect Workshop focuses on competencies and strategies to enhance your personal and leadership effectiveness, and our workplace culture. It is very interactive, practical and supportive.

The learning goals of the workshop are:

  • To better understand our colleagues and what respect and disrespect means to them.
  • To see how we can take personal responsibility for enhancing respect in our culture.
  • To identify specific strategies that we can utilize to make our culture more respectful.
  • To chart a course and make commitments to a culture of respect.

HR has met with all Deans and Senior Leaders to discuss the best way and time to offer these workshops for all faculty and staff. Over 160 workshops have been facilitated to date.

The University of Calgary offers Respect in the Workplace workshops as part of the onboarding program, UBegin. Faculty and staff are encouraged to register for a workshop if they haven't yet participated in this program.

Please click HERE if you would like to register for a workshop. (Login required)

Tips for Respectful Workplace Interaction

  • Value the many sources of knowledge that exist – respect others expertise

  • Look for places to agree, connect or support

  • Watch tone - tone is as important as the words you choose to use

  • Act in ways that edify the self-esteem of others

  • Acknowledge that I don't have to be right all of the time

  • Use "I" messages

  • Provide timely feedback – "ouch"

  • Learn to say "no" to gossip– catch yourself

  • Model good behavior – no cell phones, no side conversations during meetings

  • Seek to understand self and others

  • Value diversity

  • Consider what you really want

  • Say "Thank-you"

What strategies can I try if I am feeling disrespected?

  • Respectfully address the situation with the individual. You may want to practice this conversation first with a trusted colleague or one of the parties mentioned below. (Please note: while confiding in one colleague for this purpose is understandable, confiding in several crosses the boundary into gossip.)

  • Reach out to your supervisor

  • Reach out to your Union Steward, Faculty Association Representative, or MaPS Representative

  • Seek coaching from your HR Partner or Advisor

  • Reach out to resources through the university's Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP)

  • If situation doesn't improve, keep an incident log by date with a description of each incident in the event you want to file a formal complaint

  • Discuss the possibility of a grievance with the Faculty Association or your Union Steward, or an investigation with your HR partner

What process do I follow if I have a workplace complaint?

The University has developed a process for addressing workplace complaints that includes both a formal investigation process and more informal resolution options.

When undertaking workplace investigations in the workplace, the University must ensure a thorough investigation in a timely, procedurally fair and transparent manner, however, not all complaints will necessitate a formal investigation. Some complaints may be more appropriately and expeditiously addressed through an informal resolution process.

Informal Resolution Process

This may include problem solving meetings, mediation, facilitated group discussions, or a change in worksite to name a few. There are a variety of informal resolution options available and the best option will depend on the specific circumstances of each case and the willingness of the parties involved. Some options may be:

  • Respectfully address the situation with the individual. You may want to practice this conversation first with a colleague or one of the parties mentioned below.
  • Reach out to your supervisor
  • Reach out to your Union Steward, Faculty Association Representative, or MaPS Representative
  • Seek coaching from your HR Partner or Advisor
  • If situation doesn't improve, keep an incident log by date with a description of each incident

Formal Resolution Process for Management and Support Staff

A formal complaint may involve filing a grievance or a formal investigation through HR. The formal process for academics is still in development.

In general, when a complaint is received by HR, a determination as to whether a formal investigation is necessary will be made upon assessing the complaint and following an initial consultation with the complainant.

For more information, please click on the following links:

For an overview of the HR formal investigation process see the Investigation Flow Chart.

To register a formal complaint, please use the Complaint Form.

Formal Resolution Process for Academics

A formal written complaint may be filed with your Dean or equivalent or you may contact the Faculty Association to discuss filing a grievance.

In general, when a complaint is received by a Dean, a determination as to whether a formal investigation is necessary will be made upon assessing the complaint and following an initial consultation with the complainant.

Deans or their equivalents will work with their HR Partners in an investigation and will ensure academic staff are offered representation by the Faculty Association if they so choose.