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Symposium Program

Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy presents

THE FUTURE OF BIOMEDICAL IMAGING

SYMPOSIUM 2015

 Friday, October 23

9:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Health Science Centre - Theatre 4

Imaging in Neuroscience

Organismal Imaging & Phenomics

Ultrastructural and Cellular Imaging

 

Event Live Streaming www.ucalgary.ca/cba

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Registration/Breakfast 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.

HRIC Atrium

Opening remarks

Dr. Benedikt Hallgrimsson

Department Head, Cell Biology & Anatomy

 

Session 1: Imaging in Neuroscience

Dr. Roger Thompson

University of Calgary

“Single neuron imaging during excitotoxicity”

 Dr. Signe Bray

University of Calgary

 Brain networks in development”

Dr. Timothy H. Murphy

University of British Columbia

High-throughput automated home-cage mesoscopic functional imaging of mouse cortex”

 

Dr. Murphy obtained his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins in 1989. He is a basic scientist interested in applying high-resolution imaging and optogenetic techniques to questions involving stroke in live mice. Dr. Murphy’s lab has evaluated relationships between synaptic structure and brain circuit function during and after ischemia. Dr. Murphy is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry.  He is actively constructing and optimizing instrumentation for in vivo structural and functional brain imaging to investigate mouse models of human disease. The lab employs optogenetic tools to provide local light-activated loss or gain of circuit function to test circuit-based hypotheses about stroke recovery.

 Coffee Break 10:30 -11:00 a.m.

HRIC Atrium

Session 2: Organismal Imaging & Phenomics

Dr. Steven Boyd

University of Calgary

Bone and Joint imaging

 Dr. Benedikt Hallgrimsson

University of Calgary

 Multi-level Imaging and the Developmental Genomics of Complex Traits”

Dr. Mark Henkelman

University of Toronto

 Genes into Geometry: 3D imaging for mouse phenotyping”

Dr. R. Mark Henkelman is a Professor in the Departments of Medical Biophysics and Medical Imaging at the University of Toronto. He is a Senior Scientist and Director of the Mouse Imaging Centre (MICe) at the Hospital for Sick Children. As Director, Dr. Henkelman’s research is focused on the Mouse Imaging Centre (MICe) which incorporates high-field magnetic resonance imaging microscopy, ultrasound biomicroscopy, micro computed tomography, and several optical techniques. Using these imaging tools, MICe screens genetically-modified mice to look for phenotypes that represent human diseases and also takes established mouse models of human disease and uses imaging to follow the progression of disease and response to treatment over time. The Mouse Imaging Centre (MICe) is a major centre which became operational in 2002. It is staffed by an exciting team of 40 investigators with expertise in imaging techniques, computer science, engineering, imaging processing, developmental biology and mouse pathology. Dr. Henkelman is a co-author on over 370 publications, 640 abstracts and numerous presentations worldwide. He holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Imaging. In 1998, he was awarded a Gold Medal from the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. In 2005, he was appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a University Professor, the highest honor that the University of Toronto awards to its faculty. In 2010, he was awarded the Killam Prize in Health Sciences by the Canada Council for the Arts. When he can get away from the lab, he likes to go canoeing and kayaking. For further information, please visit: http://www.mouseimaging.ca

 Lunch and Poster Session 12:30 - 2:00 p.m.

HRIC Atrium

 

Session 3: Ultrastructural and Cellular Imaging

 Dr. Matthias Amrein

University of Calgary

New opportunities to image and probe cellular function -from mouse to molecule - at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

 Dr. Anutosh Ganguly

University of Calgary

Nanoparticles cross the alveolar epithelium by a novel combination of macropinocytosis and the caveolar pathway. An intravital and super resolution microscopy study”

   Dr. Klaus Hahn

University of North Carolina

Engineering allosteric networks to image and control signaling in vivo”

 Dr. Hahn’s laboratory focuses on two synergistic areas: development of novel tools to visualize and manipulate protein activity in living cells and animals, and application of these tools to address questions re the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling in vivo. His biological studies center on cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics, their role in signaling crosstalk, and immune cell function. While addressing specific molecules for biology, he has developed generally applicable approaches to visualize and control signaling. These include fluorescent biosensors to quantify conformational changes of endogenous proteins, novel biosensor designs that reduce cell perturbation, and biosensors based on engineered protein scaffolds to access otherwise inaccessible molecules. His laboratory has developed fluorescent dyes for enhanced biosensor sensitivity, multiplexing and single molecule microscopy. He is currently focused on new approaches to activate or inactivate proteins in vivo, using engineered domains that respond to light or small molecules. Dr. Hahn studied chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Virginia, where he received his Ph.D. He then worked as a postdoc at the Center for Fluorescence Research at Carnegie Mellon University and the Scripps Research Institute. He became an Assistant and Associate Professor at Scripps in the Neuropharmacology and Cell Biology Departments, then moved to UNC-Chapel Hill where he is the Thurman Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and director of the UNC-Olympus Imaging Center. Dr. Hahn has received the James Shannon Director’s Award and a Transformative R01 award from the NIH, and is a fellow of the AAAS. His lab’s work on biosensors was named one of the “10 Breakthroughs of the Decade” by Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology.

Coffee Break 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.

HRIC Atrium

4:00 - 4:30 p.m. (Theatre 4)

Panel Discussion


Moderator: Dr. Benedikt Hallgrimsson

 Panelists

Dr. Kamala Patel

Dr. Giuseppina (Pina) Colarusso

Dr. Bruce Pike

Dr. Klaus Hahn

Dr. Mark Henkelman

Dr. Timothy Murphy

 

Dinner Speaker

Dr. Paul Kubes

University of Calgary

“Doing Cell Biology In Vivo through imaging”

 

Closing remarks

Cocktail reception/ Live Music 5:00 – 7:30 p.m.

HRIC Atrium

 

Visit Booths

 Learn more about Imaging and Imaging Techniques at University of Calgary

Talk to Representatives from:

 Microscopy Imaging Facility (MIF)

Centre for Advanced Technologies (CAT)

Regeneration Unit in Neurobiology (RUN)

Experimental Imaging Centre (EIC)