Cumming School of Medicine

Together, we will create the future of health

At the Cumming School of Medicine, we aspire to be leaders in precision medicine in Canada.

Precision medicine takes Individual factors like genetics, health history, lifestyle and diet to determine a personalized approach to health.

It’s the future of health — researching, preventing disease and treating individuals based on each person’s unique characteristics — and we are at the forefront. Thanks to the mapping of the human genome, the path to treating individuals with far greater success is clear.

Our research institutes are poised to become leaders in the science underlying personalized medicine. With Energize: The Campaign for Eyes High, we will create the platforms and the expertise needed to deliver the future of health through our people, research, partnerships and you.

Together, we will move from treating diseases to treating people and creating healthy communities.

Cumming School of Medicine campaign goal:

$700 million

Cumming Progress

Our people, our rising stars

We are building the next generation of leaders here and around the world.

More than 4,400 researchers, clinicians and staff are engaged, responsive and committed to serving our communities, locally and globally. Philanthropy has helped recruit the best and brightest researchers like Jennifer Chan and Eric Smith, who are revolutionizing our knowledge in areas like cancer and vascular dementia — but we need more.

Recruiting leading researchers, clinicians and students will add some of the brightest minds in medical research to our team, enabling the next generation of health leaders and visionaries.

Using innovation to prevent disease and save lives

As a surgical resident, Dr. Breanne Everett was troubled by the number of patients who had lost a limb to diabetes. The disease can cause diabetic peripheral neuropathy — decreased sensation in the feet — and lead to nerve pain, infection and, eventually, amputation.

So she started a company called Orpyx that developed a pressure-sensing insole that acts as a self-monitoring device for people with diabetes. It allows them to sense feeling in their feet. At the same time, she completed her MBA at the University of Calgary’s Haskayne School of Business, combining innovation and fresh thinking to save lives.

Research platforms for health innovation

When active students, researchers, creative thinkers and innovative problem-solvers like Dr. Michael Hill and his stroke team work together, there are breakthroughs.

Our efforts span the continuum — from research in the lab to the application of new methods of treatment or prevention in the community.

With your help, key research platforms like genomics, imaging technology and bioinformatics will foster collaboration and drive innovation to solve society’s most complex health issues.

Learning how your genes influence your treatment

Enzo O'Neill has a rare genetic disorder that stops his breathing several times per week. Before he was two, he had undergone hundreds of painfully invasive medical tests and still there was no diagnosis.

So Enzo was enrolled in a Canadian research study using rapid DNA sequencing and analysis at the Cumming School of Medicine's Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute. His genes were tested against every human genetic disorder known to science — all 4,800 of them — with one test. This identified the problem and opened the door to new treatment options for Enzo.

As a result, Enzo's mom could start breathing again, too.

Partnering for healthy communities

We believe in creating a future of health that includes everyone.

Our real-world solutions help disadvantaged populations and elevate health solutions in global communities. We know many people struggle to achieve good health. We are committed to listening, learning and being respectful as we find solutions together.

Everything we do at the Cumming School of Medicine has an impact in the community — be it local or global.

Working together in Africa to save lives

Dr. Jenn Brenner has led a university partnership called Healthy Child Uganda since 2003. The Calgary pediatrician and clinical associate professor at the Cumming School of Medicine works with colleagues from Canada and Uganda. They train local health providers, health managers and volunteer village ambassadors in rural southwestern Uganda.

Projects target local health challenges such as malaria, malnutrition and maternal death.

Together, Dr. Brenner’s team, local leaders and community members work to improve the lives of mothers and children.

Join us in creating the future of health

Contact information

Barb Giba
Associate Vice President, Development
Cumming School of Medicine
403.210.8715
bgiba@ucalgary.ca