I’ll be Back: Robots in Sci-Fi and the Modern World

Join us as we compare and contrast the development of robots in sci-fi culture, like C-3PO, with modern-day versions — from drones to the Roomba vacuum cleaner. This is a family-friendly event.

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The word “robot” first appeared in popular literature in 1920 and came from the Czech words “robota,” meaning forced labour, and “rob,” meaning slave. Robots have since become a staple of science-fiction culture. But robots have taken on a different form in the modern world — from aerial drones used in recreation, science and the military, to exoskeletons and the Roomba vacuum cleaner. Join us as we compare and contrast the development of robots in sci-fi culture with those used in modern-day life. We’ll even explore the potential real-world development of a C-3PO (Star Wars) or Number Six (Battlestar Galactica).

Speakers

Darcy Grant, BSc’84

Alumnus Darcy Grant, BSc’84, is the technical manager for two UCalgary science departments: Computer Science and Mathematics and Statistics. Over the years, he has worked as a developer and as a research assistant, and has owned a consulting business.

Maurice Shevalier, BSc’82, MSc’85, MSc’93

Alumnus Maurice Shevalier, BSc’82, MSc’85, MSc’93, is a project manager and research scientist with UCalgary’s Applied GeoChemistry group (AGg).